French Wine Regions



France is one of the biggest producers of wine in the world, but if you talk to a vintner there, they’ll likely get excited about just a few hectares of vines. That’s because French wine is exceptionally focused on the idea of terroir. More than the climate and weather (though that’s part of it), terroir refers to everything about the soil, from its mineral content to the elevation of the slopes. This interest in terroir means that unlike, say, American wines, where you’ll see the grape variety listed, French wines are often identified with the place that they are produced, or the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée. The numerous AOCs fall within the broader wine-making regions of France, from the stately famous houses like Château Lafite-Rothschild and Château Pétrus in Bordeaux to the trendy rosés of Provence and the famous bubbles in Champagne. If it sounds overwhelming, have no fear: F&W’s guide to French Wine covers it all, with guides to France’s winemaking regions, ideas for classic bottles to buy and tips on how to pair French wines with food.

The Next Big Thing in Beaujolais

A small revolution is taking place in an area called Les Pierres Dorées, and it might not be long before you start seeing Pinot Noir from southern Beaujolais on shelves. Here's what we know so far.
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France Bans Foie Gras for Three Months

A bird-flu scare forces slaughterhouses to evacuate ducks and geese.
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What to Drink with Cassoulet

January 9 is National Cassoulet Day, and nothing goes better with cassoulet than a substantial Languedoc red.
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How One Couple Learned Wine Blending in the French Coutryside

An American couple living in a remote fold of southern France longed to become part of the local community. Then they got a thrilling invitation to a winemaker’s blending session.
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More France

Beyond Provence: 4 Under-the-Radar French Rosé Regions

Inside a wine shop, warming weather means the shelves will soon turn very pink—and predominately Provençal. But so many other French regions produce great rosé. Here, four to look into and the best bottles to try.
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NYC's Best Bastille Day Party

Perhaps it’s the Champagne, the crêpes or the pétanque (France’s answer to bocce ball), or some combination, but New York City has co-opted Bastille Day as its own.
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