Finally, the best Easter candy gets a home.

By Tim Nelson
February 19, 2021
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Credit: William Thomas Cain / Stringer/Getty Images

When it comes to Easter activities, your options are pretty limited: You can paint eggs and you can hunt for eggs. That's pretty much the whole list.

Maybe it doesn't have to be that way, however. And with kids likely to be spending more time inside and at home this spring than both they and their parents would ideally like, it seems like the Easter activity agenda is ripe for disruption. 

That's where Peeps' new Cookie Coop Kit comes in, further proving that edible architecture need not be limited to the Christmas season. Designed as an edible house for marshmallow Peeps, each kit includes the aforementioned candy, plus building materials like pre-baked sugar cookie wall panelling and pre-mixed icing that's used to affix an array of pastel-colored candies. On top of that there are sugar cookie chicken figures, in case you were wondering what Peeps think their product looks like when it grows up. Advertising "link & lock" technology, it sounds like building is (quite literally) a snap.

Credit: Peeps

The Cookie Coop comes at a time when the edible DIY kit seems to be popping off. It's easy to see why: Kids and parents alike are by now bored out of their minds at home, and offering children candy in exchange for working on a craft project that doesn't involve staring at a screen makes for a fair trade. We've seen it with various Halloween kits themed around Oreos and M&M's, and this new Peeps product represents an even more logical connection between kit and holiday. 

You can already find the Cookie Coops at BJ's, where they're sold with enough supplies for two coops in case you wanted to engage in a little friendly competition. Given that Lent's only just begun, you'll no doubt find this at a wider array of retailers by the time Good Friday rolls around. 

So between these Cookie Coops and the widespread return of Peeps themselves, Easter 2021 is already looking better than 2020, though, to be fair, that's a pretty insanely low bar to clear. 

This story originally appeared on allrecipes.com