Salmon



Salmon is one of the most popular fish and it’s easy to see why. It’s delicious baked, broiled, grilled, poached or served raw, and its high levels of omega-3 fatty acids and Vitamin D mean it’s healthy to boot. If you’re looking to break away from your same old salmon recipes, check out the Food & Wine guide to salmon. We make salmon sandwiches and burgers, fry it with hash, jar it, glaze it, cure it and more. The guide will also teach you which wines to pair with salmon and how to perfectly poach your fish—plus recipes for using your leftovers (if there are any). There are also grilled salmon recipes, delicious salmon pastas and more.

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Slow-Roasted Salmon with Walnut-Olive Vinaigrette

A vinaigrette bolstered with chopped olives, toasted walnuts, and fresh parsley is a bold finishing touch for roasted salmon basted with smoked paprika and lemon. The combination of basting and slow roasting yields incredibly tender salmon; the walnut-olive vinaigrette adds a briny, buttery crunch. Source skinless salmon for a  prettier presentation. To coax the most flavor from the walnuts, toast in a 350°F oven for about 12 minutes.

Shallow-Poached Salmon with Leek Beurre Blanc

Shallow poaching under a cartouche, a circle of parchment paper, yields tender fish in minutes. This method works with any mild fish, such as flounder, rockfish, or grouper. If any fillets are of uneven thickness (such as tapered portions near the tail), fold the thin portion underneath to achieve an even 3/4-inch thickness.

Salmon Niçoise Salad

Tender salmon, briny olives, crisp-tender green beans, and satisfying potatoes all soak up the zippy, perfectly balanced dressing in this variation on a classic tuna Niçoise. Don’t skip the anchovy garnish—it provides pops of umami saltiness that take this salad over the top. Niçoise olives can sometimes be hard to find, but if you can’t find them in jars, be sure to check your market’s olive bar or substitute with kalamatas if you have to.

Brown Sugar–Glazed Salmon with Buttery Roasted Squash

Chef Erick Williams recommends thick cuts of salmon for this recipe; they cook quickly while remaining juicy and tender and are well balanced by the sweet, gingery glaze. If delicata or acorn squash aren’t available, substitute 6 cups peeled and diced butternut squash.

Coulibiac of Salmon with Pickled Beets and Kale

Once the centerpiece on the tables of czars, coulibiac has a storied past. The pastry-wrapped parcel of fish and various layered fillings started its life as kulebyaka, a Russian delicacy, before being commandeered by the French and rechristened coulibiac. This modern update on the classic swaps labor-intensive brioche with store-bought phyllo, which bakes into an ethereally crisp parcel that encases lemony rice, mustard-brushed salmon, pickled beets, and garlicky kale. Each slice reveals clean, vibrant layers, packed with bold flavors. It’s a striking and delicious dish worthy of the center of any holiday table. Curly kale holds its green color beautifully even after cooking, but any hearty green, like lacinato kale or collards, will work here. Use whole-grain mustard, which adds a bit of acid and heat to the salmon, as well as a nice textural contrast from the crunchy mustard seeds. King salmon is best for this recipe; its high fat content delivers superior texture and flavor.
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More Salmon

Salmon Tartare with Pistachios and Lemon

Spoon salmon is the meat that’s scraped from the carcass of a freshly butchered fish. It would normally go to waste, but its rich flavor and silky texture make it perfect for this lemony, pistachio-studded tartare.

Grilled King Salmon with Meyer Lemon Relish

Floral and lightly acidic salsa brings out the buttery, rich flavors of grilled King salmon. Salmon is meaty enough to stay intact on a grill and gets meltingly tender as it cooks. Serve leftover salsa with grilled lamb, chicken, or pork.