Monkfish



Monkfish is sometimes called “the poor man’s lobster” because of its sweet, firm white flesh—but don’t think it’s a second-choice ingredient. Chefs love monkfish because it’s so versatile: like swordfish and tuna, it can be threaded onto skewers and grilled on kebabs without falling apart; or like cod or halibut, it can be lightly poached in a flavorful broth or roasted with vegetables. The Food & Wine guide to monkfish serves up this fish in many ways, from Eric Ripert’s Asian-inspired roast monkfish in sake broth to Mediterranean favorites like Mario Batali’s monkfish piccata.

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Monkfish Piccata

Monkfish, with its tender, springy bite reminiscent of lobster, is firm and sweet enough to stand up to this lemony butter sauce enriched with white miso. Plenty of briny capers and caperberries help cut through the richness.

Monkfish

Monkfish is sometimes called “poor man’s lobster” because of its sweet, firm white flesh, but don’t think that it’s a second choice ingredient. Chefs love monkfish because it’s so versatile: it can be threaded onto skewers and grilled on kebabs without falling apart, but monkfish can also be lightly poached in a flavorful broth or roasted with vegetables.

Crispy Monkfish with Capers

Chef Way This is Daniel Boulud's take on Wiener schnitzel, a breaded and fried veal cutlet. He lightens the dish by making it with thinly pounded monkfish fillets, breaded on only one side. He serves it with a mix of asparagus, zucchini and butternut squash. Easy Way Instead of pounding monkfish thinly, slice the fillets thinly. Serve them with asparagus—no zucchini or squash.    More Recipes From Daniel Boulud