Greek Salad

Greek salad is made from a medley of ingredients commonly consisting of tomatoes, cucumber, onions, feta and black olives. This classic, flavorful salad is dressed with simple vinaigrette or olive oil mixed with oregano. The original Greek salad contained no lettuce, but you can improvise with whatever veggies and toppings you like. This updated version features feta mousse for a lighter, creamy twist. Food & Wine’s guide will inspire you to make your next salad Greek-style.

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Horiatiki Salad with Beet Hummus

For me, a bowl of Greek salad sparks sweet remembrance of young love and romance. Each bite of juicy tomato, sandwiched with crispy cucumber and briny olives, kindles the memory of a Friday night ritual from my early years of marriage, when my husband and I would stroll hand in hand to our local pizzeria and share a mushroom pizza alongside a Greek salad. Afterwards, we would take in a movie at our local art deco cinema before meandering home, enveloped in the warm night air. Known as “horiatiki” in Greece, but as “Greek salad” almost everywhere else, this is an achingly simple dish with peasant origins, bringing together tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, olives, and feta cheese, dressed in an abundance of olive oil, and finished with a sprinkle of oregano. However, for such an uncomplicated dish, it’s still very often misinterpreted. The primary source of this confusion is lettuce. True Greek salad does not include leafy greens. The star of the dish is, of course, tomatoes. It’s believed that this salad originated as a snack in rural Greece, where farmers would venture into the field with ingredients uncut and bite straight into the chunk of feta, followed by tomato, cucumber and raw onion. Nowadays, horiatiki has gone from village salad to worldwide staple. As with all salads that rely on basic fixings, the quality of the individual ingredients is paramount. Horiatiki should embody the brightness of summer—the tomato should be ripe and syrupy, the cucumber crisp, the olives salty, and the feta tangy, and these should all be generously lubricated with the best olive oil you can find. There are also certain rules of engagement—every forkful should offer all the wondrous elements of this salad. Hence, rather than placing an unwieldy chunk of feta on top (as is often done in restaurants) I prefer to break up the feta into smaller, bite-size pieces, where the crumbly cheese also acts as a coating for the other ingredients. My horiatiki recipe is fairly traditional, with a few small quirks. Unlike the aforementioned Greek farmers, I find raw onion rather acerbic, hence I opt for slightly sweeter shallots in my recipe, which are quickly pickled in red wine vinegar and water. Soaking onions is a trick I learned from a clever Italian cooking teacher many years ago to remove the unpleasant bite from raw alliums, while also adding a gentle acidity to the onions. I give my horiatiki a special treatment by serving it with a vibrant beet hummus. The magenta beets combine with lemon and tahini to make a beautiful, show-stopping accompaniment, providing an earthy base for this fresh salad. The natural juices of the tomatoes and vinegar meld with the creamy beet dip, forming a lovely sauce, perfect for mopping up with flatbread or crusty bread.
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Greek Salad of Sorts


Of his delicious and crowd-pleasing Greek salad, Athens, Georgia, chef Hugh Acheson says, “It feeds four people like champions, or six like semifinalists.” Slideshow: More Greek Salad Recipes
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Greek Salad

Typically consisting of tomatoes, cucumber, onions, feta and olives, this classic salad features a simple vinaigrette (or just plain olive oil) mixed with oregano. The original dish has no lettuce at all, but you can transform this salad into your own version at home. We love to turn Greek salad into sandwiches, use it as a pizza topping or transform it into an inspired version of a revamped wedge salad. Here, our best Greek salad recipes.
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Greek Salad with Feta Mousse

Gavin Kaysen's Greek salad has most of the usual ingredients, like tomatoes and olives—but, in an inspired twist, he turns the traditional feta cheese into a creamy, light feta mousse. Kaysen invented the dish to impress his coach when he was training for the prestigious international Bocuse d'Or cooking competition, and he says, "It blew him away."    More Great Greek Recipes  
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Greek Easter Salad

Eggs, the symbol of renewal, make this salad especially appropriate for Easter.    Terrific Green Salads  
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Greek Kale Salad

The Good News Packed with vitamin A, kale is tasty when it's blanched and tossed with a lemon–olive oil dressing and olives, good sources of healthy fat. Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips
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