Jennifer Causey
Active Time
N/A
Total Time
15 MIN
Yield
Serves : 2


You could call them scrambled eggs, although that word doesn’t really do them justice. They’re scrambled, yes, in technical terms, but moreso coaxed—led gently through the cooking process with saintlike patience. I prefer to call them Slow Scrambies, and they’re a staple dish in the a.m. ritual I’ve dubbed #baroquebreakfast. Slow Scrambies are a morning indulgence nonpareil, not only because they are suffused with lots of good French butter, but also because making and eating them is a shamelessly decadent use of an hour.

Everything about Slow Scrambies is an exercise in intention, starting with the eggs I get at the Greenmarket in my neighborhood each week—always a half dozen so nothing sits in my fridge too long. Whisking in a few spoonfuls of cream before cooking (or a scoop of ricotta afterwards) dials up the decadence, but they’ll get plenty creamy without it. Note that the less you stir while they’re in the pan, the larger the curd; I like to whisk them consistently so the end result has the texture of soft polenta.

When everything’s ready, I drag my favorite sunny yellow chair over to the window where a few prisms catch the morning light, throwing trippy little rainbows around my kitchen.

From there I sip coffee while keeping an eye on the Scrambies, checking in to break up the curds and make sure that my how-low-can-you-go flame hasn’t given up the ghost. Whether I’m making Scrambies, or my other other-top favorites Oatsies and Toasties, #baroquebreakfast and all its languid trappings is a gift to myself from myself of my most rare commodity—time.  

How to Make It

Step

Melt butter in a medium skil- let over low. Whisk together eggs in a medium bowl. Add eggs to skillet, and cook, whisking constantly, until a polenta-like texture forms and butter combines with eggs, about 15 minutes. Remove skillet from heat, and season eggs with salt and pepper to taste.

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