Shrimp Creole

5.0
(1)

In 2018, Food & Wine named this recipe one of our 40 best: Before he was a television food mega-star, Emeril Lagasse made a name for himself as the chef at the legendary Commander's Palace in New Orleans, arguably the city's best restaurant at the time. Lagasse was an expert of "haute Creole" cooking, a complex blend of Creole and Cajun with signature dishes such as baked redfish en papillote and bread pudding soufflé. (The soufflé is still on the Commander's Palace menu today.) On a visit to New York City in 1984, Lagasse visited the Food & Wine test kitchen and shared several recipes, including his Shrimp Creole. The spicy Creole sauce has layers of flavor built on a foundation of the Cajun flavor trinity — onion, celery, and green bell pepper — mixed with garlic and sautéed in butter until tender. The Creole sauce can be made through step 4 and chilled for up to 4 days, or can be frozen for up to a month. This recipe makes more Creole seasoning than you'll need; save the remainder in an air-tight container.

Shrimp Creole
Before he was a television food mega-star, Emeril Lagasse made a name for himself as the chef at the legendary Commander’s Palace in New Orleans, arguably the city’s best restaurant at the time. Lagasse was a master of “haute Creole” cooking, a complex blend of Creole and Cajun with signature dishes such as baked redfish en papillote and bread pudding soufflé. (The soufflé is still on the Commander’s Palace menu today.) On a visit to New York City in 1984, Lagasse visited the F&W test kitchen and shared several recipes, including his shrimp Creole, a dish that stands proudly on its own when served over steamed rice, but which Lagasse used as an accompaniment to chicken-and-shrimp jambalaya. The spicy Creole sauce has layers of flavor built on a foundation of the Cajun flavor trinity— onion, celery, and green bell pepper—mixed with garlic and sautéed in butter until tender. The Creole sauce can be made through step 4 and chilled for up to 4 days, or can be frozen for up to a month. Photo: Greg DuPree
Total Time:
45 mins

Ingredients

  • cup plus 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided

  • cup plus 1 teaspoon hot paprika, divided

  • ¼ cup freshly ground black pepper

  • ¼ cup garlic powder

  • 3 tablespoons onion powder or dried minced onion

  • 2 tablespoons plus 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper, divided

  • 2 tablespoons dried thyme

  • 2 tablespoons dried oregano

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped

  • 1 medium green bell pepper, chopped

  • 2 celery stalks, chopped

  • 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped

  • 1 ¼ cups chicken stock or canned chicken broth

  • 4 fresh bay leaves

  • 2 cups coarsely chopped tomatoes

  • 3 scallions, chopped

  • 1 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

  • 1 teaspoon Louisiana-style hot sauce (such as Crystal)

  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

  • 1 ½ pounds peeled and deveined raw medium shrimp

Directions

  1. Add 1/3 cup kosher salt, 1/3 cup hot paprika, black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, 2 tablespoons cayenne pepper, thyme and oregano to a bowl and whisk to combine. Set aside Creole seasoning.

  2. Melt butter in a large skillet over medium-high. Add onion, bell pepper, celery, and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are softened but not browned, 5 to 7 minutes.

  3. Add chicken stock, 2 teaspoons Creole seasoning, remaining 1 teaspoon hot paprika, remaining 1/8 teaspoon cayenne, and bay leaves. Bring to a boil over high; reduce heat to medium, and simmer until slightly reduced, about 5 minutes. Stir in tomatoes, and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, about 10 minutes.

  4. Stir in scallions, Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt; cook, stirring often, until thick but still a little saucy, about 10 minutes. Set aside Creole sauce.

  5. Heat oil in a separate large skillet over medium-high; swirl to coat. Add shrimp; sprinkle with 2 teaspoons Creole seasoning (or to taste), and cook, stirring often, until slightly pink, about 1 minute.

  6. Add Creole sauce to shrimp; cook, stirring, until shrimp are pink, cooked through, and coated in sauce, 3 to 4 minutes

Notes

The Creole sauce can be made through step 4 and chilled for up to 4 days, or can be frozen for up to a month.

This recipe makes more Creole seasoning than you'll need; save the remainder in an air-tight container.

Updated by
Emeril Lagasse
hercules

Emeril John Lagassé III is an American celebrity chef, restaurateur, television personality, and cookbook author. Also, he won the National Best Recipe award in 2003 for his "Turkey and Hot Sausage Chili."

Johnson and Wales University awarded him an honorary doctorate after he graduated from the institution. As he honed his skills and learned the art of classical French cuisine in Paris and Lyon, France, Lagasse broadened his culinary horizons. After returning to the US, Lagasse worked in fine restaurants in New York, Boston, and Philadelphia.

His culinary skills have earned him awards and accolades. GQ magazine named him "Chef of the Year" in 1998. In 1999, People magazine named him one of the "25 Most Intriguing People of the Year." In 2004, Restaurants & Institutions magazine named him "Executive of the Year." Wine Spectator honored him in 2005 with its "Distinguished Service Award." Nation's Restaurant News inducted him into the MenuMasters Hall of Fame in 2006. New Orleans City Business named him "Restaurateur of the Year" in 2007. Food Network's South Beach Wine & Food Festival gave him a lifetime achievement award in 2009. The Smithsonian's 2012 exhibit "Food: Transforming the American Table 1950-2000" featured Lagasse's contributions to the culinary industry.

Lagasse's restaurant company, Emeril's Homebase, is located in New Orleans and consists of a restaurant, a test kitchen for cookbook and recipe development, and a boutique shop for his signature products.

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