Recipes

Whether you're looking for seasonal dishes, vegetarian recipes or gourmet classics, our guide to recipes has you covered from breakfast through dessert (and plenty in between).

Our Favorite Recipes

Wild Mushroom Toasts
For his wild mushroom toasts, chef Michael Reed starts with griddled sourdough bread, slathers it with homemade hollandaise sauce, tops it with sautéed mushrooms and spinach, and then crowns it with a mound of rich scrambled eggs. The end result is an impressive dish perfect for brunch. Reed uses a mix of mushrooms such as enoki, morel, and maitake, but you can use a mix of any fresh mushrooms available at the market.
Shrimp with Cheddar-Parmesan Grits
Chef Michael Reed gives us a lesson on why it's worth it to take the time to peel and devein your own shrimp: He cooks the shrimp shells along with vegetables and herbs to create a deeply-flavorful stock, which he then uses as a sauce for these shrimp and grits. Pan-fried shrimp are spooned on top of a mound of cheesy grits, and topped with the rich shellfish stock as the finishing touch. Store extra stock in your freezer for your next batch of shrimp and grits, or add it to seafood soups, stews, and sauces for a boost of flavor.
Buttermilk Biscuits and Sausage Gravy
To create biscuits with incredibly-distinctive flaky layers, chef Michael Reed adds very cold, thinly-sliced butter to the dry ingredients and folds the dough over several times. The accompanying gravy is packed with sausage and makes for a truly satisfying breakfast. The recipe calls for pork sausage, but you can use chicken or turkey sausage instead. You can also cut the recipe in half for a smaller group. If you'd like, top the biscuits and gravy with fried eggs.
Vegan Mapo Tofu
"In this vegan version of mapo tofu, instead of ground pork, finely-chopped eggplant and mushrooms cook down to a meaty consistency that absorbs a richly-savory blend of broad bean paste and mushroom seasoning — two umami-packed ingredients that quickly add long-cooked flavor. Szechuan peppercorns and fresh ginger are balanced by a touch of sugar to round out this moderately-spicy dish. "My grandparents, who were from different parts of the world, colored my flavor map," says Jocelyn Law-Yone, executive chef and co-owner of Thamee in Washington, D.C., a 2020 Food & Wine Best New Restaurant, who came up with this meatless version of the classic Szechuan dish. "My paternal grandfather was from Yunnan, China, where tofu is enjoyed in countless ways by many different tribes. In Burma, where both my grandmothers were born, there's a counterpart of tofu called 'tohu' — it mimics the texture of tofu but tastes nuttier because it is made of besan flour." Known as "Chef JoJo" to her team, Law-Yone combined elements from her grandparents' cooking with her own twists to create this dish. "The additional layers of mushrooms and eggplants are mine but would have been familiar ingredients to all my grandparents.""
White Gold
This sweet and sour soju cocktail from Kim Kyungmoon brings to mind the tart creaminess of a gin fizz but brings the punchier, grain-forward notes of Golden Barley 40% soju in place of floral gin. The frothy egg white cuts through those brightly boozy and acidic flavors to balance each sip. Soju, a Korean spirit made by distilling rice wine, is enjoying a renaissance in Korea; Kyungmoon imports it and sells it though his online shop, Woorisoul.
Forever Young
Inspired by the classic Adonis cocktail of sherry and vermouth, this stiff drink from Kim Kyungmoon balances earthy, fermented Chungju with amaro. Chungju, a Korean alcoholic beverage brewed from rice, and Amaro Nonino both offer a pleasantly musky, nutty flavor, while vermouth shines through with a burst of sweetness. For a source for artisanal Chungju from Korea's oldest brewery, visit Woorisoul.
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More Recipes

Anchovy Toasts with Fresh Tomato Vinaigrette
The Anchovy Bar, sister restaurant to State Bird Provisions in San Francisco, celebrates the tiny, humble fish in a host of ways, including this made-to-share snack board of quality Spanish anchovy fillets, ripe heirloom tomatoes, and fresh Japanese cucumbers. "The build-your-own aspect of this dish makes the simplicity work so well," says co-owner Nicole Krasinski, who opened the restaurant with her husband, Stuart Brioza, a 2003 Food & Wine Best New Chef. "Everything is meant to be clean and fresh and offer a great balance to the salty anchovies." Source a variety of quality tinned anchovies from caputos.com to taste the differences in salinity and texture. This build-your-own toast board is ideal for entertaining or a light alfresco meal. Try using any leftover tomato vinaigrette tossed with pasta as a simple no-cook sauce.
Pan-Seared Skirt Steaks with Carrot Puree and Braised Cabbage
Velvety carrot puree, tender pan-seared steaks, and braised cabbage come together in a beautifully composed dish topped with a fresh, punchy cilantro gremolata from 2019 Food & Wine Best New Chef Paxx Caraballo Moll of Jungle BaoBao in San Juan, Puerto Rico. A well-prepared mise en place is the key here: Cut and measure ahead of time to cook and plate with ease. "I love the flavor explosions and textures you get from this dish," says Moll. "Transforming a humble cut of meat, making it delicious, and seeing people's faces and all the great feedback make me proud of this dish. The sweetness of the carrots makes a great contrast with our gremolata, and every bite feels refreshing."

Keralan Egg Curry

Coconut milk, tomatoes, and onions add vegetal sweetness that rounds out the fruity piquancy of Kashmiri chile powder and Thai chiles in this warmly-spiced egg curry. It's South Indian dish that chef Margaret Pak of Thattu in Chicago, a 2020 Food & Wine Best New Restaurant first learned to make from her husband, who is originally from Kerala. "The first time I had egg curry, my boyfriend (now husband) made it for me. I was mesmerized that a simple egg dish could be so comforting and delicious," she says. For the brightest flavor, toast and grind whole spices in small batches just before adding to this curry or any dish. Curry sprigs are tender and will continue to add flavor after cooking; feel free to leave them in for serving.