Asian Noodles

Udon, ramen, soba and rice noodles are all widely used in Asian cooking, and you can find almost all of them at your local grocery store. Use Chinese-style egg noodles to make your own take out, like in this super easy version of beef and broccoli chow mein. The key to this recipe is the sauce; made from brown sugar, rice vinegar, hoisin, soy sauce and oyster sauce, it's perfectly sweet and savory. Thicker noodles like udon are great for chilled or room-temperature salads-once they're cooked, mix with julienned vegetables, shrimp, cilantro, ginger, teriyaki sauce and chile sauce for a quick and easy lunch. Find these recipes and more in F&W's guide to Asian noodles.

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Hong Kong-Style Bagged Noodles 
Growing up in Hong Kong, we wouldn't go on mall dates and eat at Auntie Anne's. Instead, we'd wander the streets of Mongkok with a palm-sized bag of noodles in hand, with two bamboo skewers stuck in them as makeshift chopsticks. In Hong Kong's many shopping districts, you'll find these stalls that sell chilled noodles in a bag with a slew of ingredients you can top them with: octopus, seaweed salad, ham, corn, bean sprouts, etc. The sauce is straightforward but what makes it so outstanding is the punch of the raw garlic and the endless possibilities of toppings.
Chilled Soba Noodle Salad with Yuzu Dressing
As the summer approaches, I like to turn to lighter refreshing vinaigrettes to dress noodles and salads. Using the ready-made jams and marmalades found in Asian supermarkets, we can build a huge variety of dressings for chilled noodles that pair excellently with a variety of vegetables creating a dish that is anything but the generic "Asian-style noodle salads" we see across the US. Instead, we'll bring yuzu honey concentrate, yuzu kosho, and ponzu, as true East Asian ingredients that help punctuate yuzu's lively fruit flavors that inspired this fusion dish in the first place. Note: the tea looks like marmalade. Like tea leaves, hot water is added to make tea.
Chilled Sesame Noodles
There's good reason to believe that cold sesame noodles were first brought to New York 40 years ago by chef Shorty Tang at Hwa Yuan in Chinatown. Since then, chilled sesame noodles have been a ubiquitous part of Chinese takeout. At Junzi, sesame noodles have been one of our signature dishes since we opened, thanks to a deeply flavorful, carefully layered sesame sauce made of pure sesame paste, aromatics, and fermented tofu. Finish off the dish with chile oil and it's a classic-but not like one you've had before. 
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Life-Changing Udon with Soft-Boiled Egg, Hot Soy, and Black Pepper
Rating: Unrated
2
Butter, egg yolk, and starch enrich the soy broth, dressing chewy udon noodles in a silky sauce inspired by Hetty McKinnon's visit to Udon Shin, a restaurant in Tokyo's bustling Shinjuku ward. Sharp black pepper and scallions break up its deeply savory edge with light spice and fresh flavor.
Soba Noodles with Crispy Duck and Hot Dipping Sauce
The combination of cold, chewy homemade soba noodles with steaming-hot crispy duck and dashi-enriched dipping sauce is an unparalleled delight. Timing is key when making this dish—cook the soba just before you serve. Work ahead by steeping the dashi and seasoning the duck the night before or the morning of cooking. For the purest flavor, seek out hon mirin (“real mirin”), which has no added sweeteners or salt.
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More Asian Noodles

Homemade Soba Noodles
Tender and supple with the perfect chewy texture, these from-scratch buckwheat soba noodles are easy to master. Don’t worry about adding too much starch; tapping the noodles gently before cooking gets rid of any excess. Serve them with Sonoko Sakai’s Crispy Duck and Hot Dipping Sauce or store-bought mentsuyu (noodle soup base).
Longevity Noodles with Oyster, Shiitake, and Enoki Mushrooms
Rating: Unrated
1
The longer the better to symbolize longevity, these spicy, savory noodles are a must for Lucky Chow producer Danielle Chang at her Lunar New Year feast. Cutting the noodles is strictly forbidden because cutting is a metaphor for shortening a life, so twirl the long strands to serve and eat. A mix of torn and sliced mushrooms (also a symbol of health and longevity) adds a variety of textures and a bite of umami to this quick-cooking dish.

Ramped Up Ramen

Rating: 5 stars
1

Packaged ramen noodles get doctored with egg, cabbage, ham and scallions in this quick microwave-dinner dish. Feel free to swap out the cabbage for spinach, or replace the ham with roasted chicken. Slideshow: More Ramen Recipes