James Corden poked fun at the Governor's Ball mishap with a few billboards of his own. 

Abbey White
March 06, 2018

The old saying “an actor was robbed” got taken to a very literal level after it was revealed Wolfgang Puck’s photographer spoiled a thief's plans during the official Oscars after-party

The head chef for The Governor’s Ball, the Academy Awards' post-show soiree, got attached to the odd Hollywood controversy after his photographer apprehended a man attempting to walk out with Frances McDormand’s statue. News of the near-snatching first broke after a New York Times culture reporter tweeted police were looking for a man, now identified as Terry Bryant, who proclaimed the Best Actress winner’s trophy was his “best [music] producer” honor. Cara Buckley tweeted that “Wolfgang Puck’s photographer stopped [Bryant], got the Oscar back, and the guy disappeared back into the ball.”

 

Bryant had a ticket to the event and even posted video of himself on Facebook parading the trophy—which like all the golden statues was set to be engraved—as his own. As Buckley reported, the Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri actress was eventually reunited with her Oscar and had her evening unsoured thanks to Puck’s photographer. McDormand’s rep Simon Halls revealed in an email to Variety that she followed up the somewhat upsetting after-party experience by celebrating the reunion with a double cheeseburger from In-N-Out.

During last night’s The Late Late Show, host James Corden took a swipe at both the weird attempted theft and the fact that the after-party’s renowned chef even had a personal photographer. “You know you’re rich when you can pay a guy to take Instagram photos of your food,” Corden joked in his late night opening before using fake billboards to address the entire stolen trophy debacle.

“Never mind, Wolfgang Puck’s photographer found it,” read one, while another stated, “Why does Wolfgang Puck have a photographer?”

Kidding aside, it seems Wolfgang Puck’s decision to hire a photographer ended up being a recipe for avoiding a disaster.