Tim Ho Wan is bringing Michelin-starred dim sum to the Palms Casino Resort. 

Maria Yagoda
July 31, 2018

The Las Vegas dining scene just keeps getting better and better. In the second half of 2019, the one-Michelin-starred dim sum giant Tim Ho Wan will open in Las Vegas at the Palms Casino Resort. Since the first Tim Ho Wan location opened to critical acclaim in Hong Kong in 2009, dozens of locations have sprouted up around the world, with popular outposts in Southeast Asia, Taiwan, Macau, Australia, and New York.

According to a press release, the restaurant "will be part of the resort’s west casino expansion." Tim Ho Wan, which for a stretch of time was the cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant in the world, will be joining new concepts from Bobby Flay, Michael Symon, and Marc Vetri, which are scheduled to open later this year at the Palms.

Cofounders Mak Kwai Pui and Leung Fai Keung will, of course, be bringing their sweet baked BBQ pork buns and popular dim sum classic, as well as "an original Las Vegas inspired creation" that chef Mak Kwai Pui will develop specifically for that location. 

The opening should be chaotic. Hours before Tim Ho Wan opened its doors in New York in 2017, there was a 100-person line waiting outside the 60-seat restaurant at 10 a.m. (The temperature was 20 degrees, if that helps paint a picture of the devotion Tim Ho Wan inspires.) 

2018 has been an impressive year for the Las Vegas restaurant scene, which continues to snatch locations of some of the best restaurants in the world. This February, China Tang opened in MGM Grand, which F&W reporter Andy Wang called "nothing less than game-changing."

"China Tang’s stunning Beijing duck takes more than 24 hours to prepare before it’s roasted in an imported oven," Wang wrote. "The duck is carved tableside and divided into portions of glorious crispy skin, wonderfully fatty skin-on meat and trimmed meat. Then duck scraps are used for a grand-finale dish like salt-and-pepper duck or lettuce wraps." 

The dim sum at China Tang is excellent, too—but we've always felt that the more dim sum, the better. 

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