Courtesy of Kia Delgato / Shutterstock

The artwork is part of stock imagery site Shutterstock's annual Oscar Pop! design series.

Abbey White
March 01, 2018

Shutterstock, the online platform best known for its stock photo assets, has released its annual Oscar Pop! poster series. The collection offers alternative art for Best Picture nominated movie posters, largely done in the style of famous pop artists and created using imagery from the site's collection of over 180 million images. Channeling the likes of Richard Hamilton's mix of collage and painting, the minimalist typographic approaches of Ed Ruscha, and the anime-inspired aesthetic of Takashi Murakami, Shutterstock's in-house designers have brought a new life and look to the 90th Academy Awards’ nine nominees. But beyond this Oscar-themed poster series’ ability to catch your eye, it also proves this year’s Best Picture award should probably go to food.

Courtesy of Tim Harrison / Shutterstock
Courtesy of Kia Delgato / Shutterstock

Almost half of Shutterstock’s reinterpreted posters feature food and drink as a prominent part of the artwork. The poster for Call Me By Your Name—which was inspired by artist James Rosenquist—features a soft-boiled egg and peach, foods so narratively noteworthy they made it onto Alamo Drafthouse’s Valentine’s Day screening menu. Eggs played a role in The Shape of Water’s human and mer-creature romance, as its symmetrical style poster inspired by Austrian artist Kiki Kogelnik acknowledges.

If you look close enough, the signature Keith Haring style poster for horror film Get Out very subtly points to the film’s central mechanism of fear: a teacup. Meanwhile, Phantom Thread’s poster in the style of Malika Favre’s more geometric treatments embraces the film’s food scenes (which were so important they impacted the film’s soundwork) through teacups and an “unusual mushroom.”

Courtesy of Alice Lee / Shutterstock
Courtesy of Florence Lau / Shutterstock

While many have championed the diversity of this year’s Best Picture crop, Shutterstock’s pop poster collection proves that regardless of a film’s genre, leads, or subject, food is always a winner.