The food activism-themed series debuts on May 15.

By Mike Pomranz
April 03, 2019
Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Nearly a year has passed (11 months to be exact), since news broke that L.A. chef and food truck pioneer Roy Choi would be hosting his own TV show, Broken Bread. At the time of that announcement, the series — which was billed as highlighting the “culinary and agricultural practices that are transforming food access, food justice and community” — was slated for an early 2019 premiere.

Well, no one said making a TV show was easy, and things have gotten pushed back a bit to mid-May, according to the Hollywood industry publication Variety. But like a good chef should, Choi and company have decided get us hooked with a small taste: a new 84-second preview of the show.

In the clip, Choi touches on most of his usual talking points: street food, nourishing and feeding people, challenging conventional thought, having a purpose, the connection between health and food, community, social justice, breaking bread, being a voice for the people… It’s all in there.

“Hopefully through the show you’ll meet a lot of people who are out there every day trying to make a difference without any investors or big machine behind them, waking up and loading their car and putting love into the universe,” he told Variety.

As far as individual episodes, Variety says the series will cover issues like waste, immigration, and sustainability. “The first installment looks at the power of cooking to help rehabilitate those on the margins of society,” the trade publication writes. “Other episodes investigate bringing healthy food options to communities that lack fresh food; the future of food using non-traditional protein sources and meat replacements; solutions to food waste; and cannabis culture, including an interview with Cheech Marin.” Additionally, the final episode of the season will look at the “real” story behind Locol, the acclaimed, but ultimately not-quite-successful restaurant Choi opened in Watts.

Broken Bread is set to debut on May 15 on PBS channel KCET in Southern California and on Tastemade TV’s streaming platform, and will be available soon after on Link TV, DirecTV, and Dish Network, as well as at brokenbread.tv and on the free PBS app.

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