A portion of the subscription service's proceeds will support National Public Radio.
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A few years ago, NPR's now-late food-focused blog The Salt ran an entire week of coffee coverage that it called—wait for it—Coffee Week. During those seven days, it explored coffee's origins and historical impact, focused on the role of women in coffee production, and explained what some of those certifications printed on bags of coffee actually mean.

NPR Coffee Club beans from Counter Culture
Credit: Courtesy of Counter Culture Coffee

The fact that I'm the kind of person who remembers random NPR segments from a half-decade ago pretty much confirms that I'm the kind of person who will sign up for the media organization's new coffee club. The just-launched subscription service, which is called—wait for it, again—NPR Coffee Club, is a way for public radio listeners to combine their love for NPR with their straight-up need for specialty coffee.

The club is a collaboration between NPR and Durham, North Carolina-based Counter Culture Coffee. Subscribers will be allowed to pick from "a rotating selection" of Counter Culture's single-origin and signature blend whole bean coffees. In addition to existing Counter Culture favorites, club members will also have access to its limited-edition releases and single-serve products. (The first members-only exclusive is Oro de Santafé, a single-origin coffee from Colombia's Nariño region.)

"NPR is proud to offer listeners a new way to support NPR's mission while experiencing delicious coffees from around the world," Jane Scott, Director of Consumer Products at NPR, said in a statement. "NPR listeners are curious and love to know the story behind the story. They'll be able to do this when they join the NPR Coffee Club, since it will educate and inform members about the history, culture, and creation of coffee."

Yes, basically you can make every week an NPR Coffee Week, which sounds pretty great. Would-be club members can choose either one ($19) or two different ($36.10) Counter Culture coffees with their subscription and can sign up to receive between one and four 12-ounce bags of that particular coffee with each shipment. Members can also decide how often they would like to receive their coffee; deliveries can be made once a month, or as frequently as once a week.

"We are thrilled to work with NPR on this exciting initiative," Brett Smith, Counter Culture Coffee's President and Founder, said. "For 25 years, Counter Culture Coffee has been focused on providing exceptional coffee experiences. This partnership allows us to highlight our commitment to quality, sustainability, and education; values that closely align with NPR and their loyal listeners."

A portion of the proceeds from each subscription will be used to support NPR programming—even if you're not drinking that cup of Oro de Santafé out of a faded "All Things Considered" coffee mug. Each subscriber will also receive an NPR coffee club enamel pin which will be a great way to flash some nerd cred once we're allowed in public again.