Tickets to the ‘Noma Guide to Fermentation’ talk are on sale now.

By Mike Pomranz
August 20, 2018
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Americans diner may dream of a trip to visit Noma, but actually going to the acclaimed restaurant is a completely different endeavor: Reservations aren’t easy to come by and it requires planning a special trip to Copenhagen. But this October, Chef René Redzepi is coming to America. No, sadly, it’s not some sort of Noma pop-up. Instead, he’ll be in New York City giving a talk about his forthcoming book on fermentation. But the truly good news is that tickets are still available, and hopefully by the time the event is done, you’ll be prepared to recreate some of that Noma magic in your own home.

The Noma Guide to Fermentation, set to be released on October 16, will be the first in a three-part cookbook series called Foundations of Flavour that was announced last year. Since this initial tome is specifically dedicated to fermentation—including topics like “koji, kombuchas, shoyus, misos, vinegars, garums, lacto-ferments, and black fruits and vegetables”—it’s co-authored by Noma’s Director of Fermentation David Zilber. As you may remember from all the buildup surrounding the launch of the “New Noma” in February, the promise of a new, dedicated fermentation lab was one of the noteworthy highlights.

On October 22, both these renowned culinary minds will take the stage at Buttenwieser Hall in New York City for a talk presented by 92Y. “Now you, too, can bring the culinary magic of Noma to your meals with The Noma Guide to Fermentation,” the event description promises. “Gain unprecedented insight into Noma’s creative process as Redzepi and Zilber stop by 92Y to show you how to achieve complex, nuanced, and delicious flavors through fermentation—in your very own kitchen.” Who wants to read a cookbook when you can just have Redzepi and Zilber explain it to you!

As of this writing, tickets are still available—with general admission priced at $35—but it’s likely that they won’t last long.

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