The structure is even made of beer-infused cookies.
Advertisement

Building a gingerbread house can be either a super-memorable part of your holiday season or a guaranteed argument with whoever casually ate half of the roof… or both. In the past couple of years, we've seen creative versions of the December staple, ranging from a gingerbread-free "gingerbread" house for cats, an incredible gingerbread Hogwarts castle, and a completely over-the-top $78,000 pearl-and-ruby encrusted gingerbread house that could be designed to look like your own home.

This year, Miller High Life is giving gingerbread a go with its first-ever Gingerbread Dive Bar Kit. According to Ad Age, the ready-to-assemble bar comes with Miller High Life-infused "wall" pieces, a tiny pool table with miniature pretzel cues, hanging lights with gumdrop shades, peppermint bar stools, and even a pair of little cornhole boards underneath a peppermint-supported pergola. The most adorably accurate detail is the bar's floor: it's meant to be coated with maple syrup, to give it the signature stickiness of its real-life counterparts. (It's probably best if you don't think about what makes your shoes stick to those floors.)

Miller High Life Gingerbread Dive Bar Kit
Credit: Courtesy of Miller High Life

The Miller High Life Dive Bar Gingerbread Kit will retail for $50 and will be available on the Miller High Life website, starting on Monday, December 6. If you want to get your hands on one, you can subscribe to the Miller High Life mailing list so you'll be informed the very second they drop. (And as tasty as the finished product might look, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel says that the bar is "designed for fun, but not for consumption.")

Miller High Life Gingerbread Dive Bar Kit
Credit: Courtesy of Miller High Life

Last year, Ikea Canada provided its own unique twist on the tradition by offering printable patterns that could be used to make gingerbread versions of some of the Swedish retailer's most iconic pieces of furniture. There were downloadable instructions for tiny Billy bookcases, a Jokkmokk table, and a Strandmon armchair and — because IKEA — you had to assemble each item yourself.