Let it take you away. 

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KFC isn't afraid of a marketing stunt. In the past year, the brand has teamed up with Drunk History to recount the story of Colonel Sanders (he started the company when he was 65!), released scratch 'n' sniff Valentine's Day cards scented with fried chicken (and "the heavenly aroma of the Colonel’s 11 herbs and spices”), and brought its Romanian branch's signature "vampire repellent" garlic sauce to KFC locations worldwide for Halloween. So it's no surprise that the fast food giant has tapped into the current wellness boom by releasing a relaxation playlist.

If you watched a lot of daytime TV in the '90s, you probably remember commercials for an ambient compilation CD called Pure Moods. The ads were iconic—they began with a unicorn bounding through a soft-focus forest, accompanied by Enigma's "Return to Innocence." Unlike Pure Moods, KFC's take on soothing music doesn't include a pulsing remix of the X-Files theme song. Like Pure Moods, the brand claims that a state of zen can be achieved through sound—in this case, the sound of chicken frying, specifically.

Yes, KFChill—which you can listen to via the site (kfchill.co.uk) on desktop or mobile—delivers 60 minutes of sizzling chicken and simmering gravy noises. The verdict: not not relaxing! (Although, we don't recommend listening while hungry.) While KFChill probably won't replace your Headspace app, it turns out that frying chicken sounds a bit like falling rain, meaning it may fall under the category of "pink noise" (other examples: waves lapping on the beach, leaves rustling). According to some scientists, pink noise—or, as UC Berkeley puts it, "white noise with the bass turned up"—can aid with deep sleep and memory.

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Credit: Mark56 Records

Is a sizzling chicken playlist just not your thing? You might want to check out KFC's earlier stuff. Back in 1968, the chain put out a jazz album called Colonel Sanders' Tijuana Picnic (pictured above) filled with bangers like "Chili Verde," "Green Peppers," and "El Garbanzo."