Only 50 of these strange art pieces have been produced.

By Mike Pomranz
Updated: June 12, 2019
Erick Moore

Kentucky Fried Chicken is one of those brands that has continued to build excitement through outlandish advertising gimmicks: from a firelog that smells like 11 herbs and spices to offering $11,000 to name your kid after Colonel Sanders to stripping “Chickendale” dancers. But a group called Kentucky for Kentucky — which seeks to independently promote the state — may have even out-KFC-ed, the actual KFC. This morning, they unveiled their “Chick-Infinity” — a real KFC drumstick preserved with clear epoxy resin inside a 16-ounce mason jar. And if you move quickly enough, it can be yours for just $100.

“The only bad thing about a bucket of Kentucky Fried Chicken is that it never lasts long enough,” Kentucky for Kentucky writes on its website about the project, which is not officially affiliated with the fast food brand. “We wanted to capture that feeling in a product that didn’t disappear into a pile of bones as soon as it’s opened.”

Erick Moore

To achieve that goal, they teamed up with Kentucky-based artist Coleman Larkin. The two partnered earlier this year to create “Derby Turds” — actual poop from 1997 Kentucky Derby winner Silver Charm preserved in mason jars. That concept proved successful enough that they’ve expanded this silly Dixieland Preserves line with a less “crappy” idea: preserving KFC drumsticks.

Only 50 of the resulting “Chick-Infinity” jars have been produced, billed as “the world’s first everlasting KFC drumstick.” The Original Recipe chicken was sourced from a KFC in Coal Run, Kentucky. From there, Larkin uses a “propriety process” to finish the job.

“I’m a Kentuckian, and every ‘Chick-Infinity’ is a fried chicken leg from a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant in Kentucky. Plus it’s in a mason jar,” Larkin explained. “Never before has a product packed so much Southerness into 16 ounces.”

If all of this madness sounds up your alley — or the alley of a loved one who likes weird gifts — these preserved fried chicken drumsticks went on sale this morning for $100 a pop. The good news is that as of this writing, at least some of the 50 are still available. The bad news is that once they are gone, they’re gone — and you’ll be left embalming your own fried chicken.

Meanwhile, the Chick-Infinity is far from the first time Kentucky for Kentucky has been on our radar. Back in 2014, we covered the group for selling gold-plated KFC bone jewelry. In 2015, they were behind an unofficial KFC Double Down-scented candle. And in 2017, they launched a petition to make bourbon the official state beverage of Kentucky. These guys certainly know how to get people talking about Kentucky!

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