With Starbucks testing via Uber Eats, the coffee delivery wars are brewing.

By Bridget Hallinan
February 08, 2019
Bill Clark/Getty Images

Going on a morning coffee run is a pretty longstanding ritual for many Americans—grabbing an iced latte on the way to work, or a shot of espresso to perk up before your daily errands. And, with third-party delivery services like GrubHub, Seamless, and UberEats, it’s easier than ever to streamline that routine and have one less stop in your day. Starbucks started testing out UberEats delivery in September 2018, and now currently services San Francisco and Miami—Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Washington D.C. are slated for spring. Next up? Dunkin’ (rebranded from Dunkin’ Donuts), which announced Thursday that it's testing delivery with GrubHub, reports Nation’s Restaurant News.

There’s no word yet on where the delivery tests will take place, or how widespread the delivery service may be. Grubhub is by far the nation’s largest third-party delivery app service, controlling around half the market, according to USA Today—so if this partnership goes national, it would be huge. Dunkin’ has 8,500 locations across America, spanning 41 states, according to its site, so it could also provide some healthy competition for Starbucks’ UberEats venture, considering Dunkin’ is generally less expensive to boot.

Dunkin’ isn’t the only chain to recently partner with Grubhub, either—on Thursday, Taco Bell officially became officially available on the food delivery site, with about 65 percent of Taco Bell locations included across the country, as previously reported by Food & Wine. (And, for a limited time, you can score free delivery on orders over $12 too.) KFC may soon to follow as both chains are owned by Yum! Brands which bought shares in Grubhub last year.

It’s worth noting that Dunkin’ is already available on DoorDash, which, despite being smaller than Grubhub and UberEats, has the largest geographic reach (all 50 states, as previously reported by Food & Wine). It’ll be interesting to see how a potential Grubhub deal may affect their relationship; however, Dunkin’ has “no plans to end that partnership at this time,” according to NRN. As these third-party delivery services continue to heat up and service more restaurants, it remains to be seen which route brands will go with—the best deal, or the biggest reach. Or, as is currently the case, perhaps both.

Advertisement