Courtesy of Whole Foods

The e-commerce giant is also exploring its own banking service for U.S. customers.

Charlie Heller
March 05, 2018

The Amazon rainforest may be located in South America, but a different set of Amazon-supplied resources is making its way to the streets of Europe. That's right: this weekend, that checkout-less grocer, Whole Foods-deliverer, and Gordon Ramsay beration-facilitator known as Amazon.com announced it's aiming to launch a grocery delivery service in France, according to Quartz.

So far, that's about as deep as the available information gets, as Amazon France head Frederic Duval told French (both nationally and linguistically) paper Journal du Dimanche that "we would very much like to launch this service in France, but everything in its own time," and that, per Quartz's translation "a launch represents an investment."

As for whether Amazon will make that investment on its own, or in partnership with existing French companies, the evidence points to several possibilities. Système U, a French "retailers' cooperative" made up of about 8,000 independent supermarkets, discussed a possible deal with Amazon last month to become its supplier in the country, and just settled a dispute with the French government over non-reported taxes, so it seems like whatever plan happens, Amazon is serious about France.

And France isn't the only direction Amazon is looking to take its ever-expanding business model to. Also announced today, according to CNBC, it's looking to build a "checking-account-like" product in tandem with financial institutions aimed at younger customers and people without banking accounts.

Amazon isn't legally able to make loans, so it seems likely that the company wouldn't become a bank, just offer an Amazon-branded account, but either way, it’s clear there's no end in sight to the areas that the site, which was once just an online bookstore, is working to plant its roots in. But with at least one survey showing that a sizeable portion of existing Prime users would be open to using an Amazon checking or even savings account as their primary account, it seems like just about anything Amazon tries to do could soon be hard to avoid.