Lamb Recipes



It’s a shame that lamb is typically reserved for special occasions like Easter and Passover dinner. This versatile protein can be cooked in any number of styles and makes an easy weeknight meal. Do you like pork chops? Try lamb chops—tender cuts from the rib, shoulder or loin that can be roasted or pan-cooked just like a pork chop or steak. Try subbing in ground lamb for ground beef, or use it to make Mediterranean favorites like moussaka and lamb meatballs. Looking for a make-ahead meal? Try stewing lamb. It holds up well in slow cookers and makes delicious, freezable stews and braises. Whether you’re making lamb the star of your holiday feast or you simply want to change up your weeknight routine, the F&W guide to lamb has you covered, with recipes for fast lamb chops, leg of lamb, grilled lamb and more.

Most Recent

Achiote-Marinated Quail with Grilled Peaches

These demure birds get a punch of bold flavor and crimson color from the annatto seeds in the flavorful marinade; also known as achiote seeds, they’re available at most Latin markets. Choose firm peaches for this recipe; they’ll hold up best on the grill and soften nicely as they cook.
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The Easiest (and Best) Fried Chicken Comes from Indiana

Seasoned just with salt and plenty of coarsely ground pepper, this regional favorite is hard to beat.
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More Lamb

Bolognese Meat Sauce

Ragù, as the Bolognese call their celebrated meat sauce, is characterized by mellow, gentle, comfortable flavor that any cook can achieve by being careful about a few basic points: The meat should not be from too lean a cut; the more marbled it is, the sweeter the ragù will be. The most desirable cut of beef is the neck portion of the chuck. Add salt immediately when sauteing the meat to extract its juices for the subsequent benefit of the sauce. Cook the meat in milk before adding wine and tomatoes to protect it from the acidic bite of the latter. Do not use a demiglace or other concentrates that tip the balance of flavors toward harshness. Use a pot that retains heat. Earthenware is preferred in Bologna and by most cooks in Emilia-Romagna, but enameled cast-iron pans or a pot whose heavy bottom is composed of layers of steel alloys are fully satisfactory.Reprinted with permission from Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking by Marcella Hazan. Copyright 1992 by Marcella Hazan. Published by Knopf.
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How to Talk About Beef Like an Expert

Everything you need to know about aging techniques, primal cuts, and how to store your beef.
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The Cattle at This Zen California Ranch Basically Run the Joint

Genesee Valley Ranch takes every possible step to be extremely respectful to their cows.