Beef Recipes

Fantastic ways to cook steaks, burgers, brisket and barbecue-all tested and perfected by Food & Wine editors.

Most Recent

Smoke-Grilled Tri-Tips with Jeow Som Dipping Sauce

2020 F&W Best New Chef Donny Sirisavath of Khao Noodle Shop in Dallas shared this recipe, a nod to his Laotian heritage and Texas upbringing, when his parents grilled brisket over hardwood coals for family gatherings. Here, thick and meaty tri-tip steaks get seared on the hot zone of the grill and then slowly smoke-grilled until medium-rare. Let them rest, and then thinly slice them against the grain and serve with Sirisavath's jeow som, a fiery, fish sauce–flavored dipping sauce. A quick soak in beer tenderizes thick tri-tip steaks, and a marinade of garlic, lemongrass, cilantro, and fish sauce builds big flavor. Sirisavath loves using oak or mesquite wood here, placed at the center of the grill, alongside the lit coals, where they smolder and add a rich aroma.

Beef Wellington

Wrapped in golden, buttery puff pastry and filled with deeply savory mushroom duxelles, beef Wellington is an unforgettable centerpiece to any feast. Dried porcini deliver extra umami to the beef, while a touch of Dijon and chopped herbs adds a layer of freshness as well. Skipping the foie gras makes the dish more approachable, and swapping out the traditional crepe lining for phyllo (thanks to a trick from Kenji Lopez-Alt) streamlines the process, but beef Wellington still demands several hours of searing, stuffing, rolling, and chilling to ensure its magical result.

Beef Bone Broth

This rich, long-simmered beef bone broth is terrific when used as stock in recipes, but is just as satisfying and delicious enough when enjoyed straight from a mug, gently warmed and topped with a bit of freshly ground pepper. You’ll want to make a trip to the butcher to find your soup bones, since they’ll need to be halved by the butcher with a bandsaw for maximum flavor in the broth.

Prakas' Rib Eye

Freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano adds an unexpected hit of nutty, sweet flavor to rib eye steaks marinated in Thai seasoning sauce, white pepper, and soy sauce in this Night + Market recipe by Kris Yenbamroong, who named the dish for his father, Prakas. Quickly searing the steaks allows them to develop a dark, flavorful crust before resting, slicing, and finishing them in the pan sauce, where they absorb even more flavor and cook to a perfect medium-rare. Stirring fresh Thai basil into the warm steak and tomatoes just before serving allows it to gently perfume the whole dish.

Garlic-Butter Steak Bites

These quickly stir-fried beef bites deliver all the savory luxury of a steakhouse-caliber steak, without the stress over cooking one at home. The buttery, velvety sauce coats every piece nicely, and the vermouth’s herbal richness pairs nicely with the savory Worcestershire. Serve as an appetizer with toothpicks, or enjoy over mashed potatoes or polenta.
Advertisement

More Beef

Hanger Steaks with Cabbage-and-Beet Salad

“Cabbage is a hard sell on restaurant menus, so it’s very underutilized but a great vegetable,” says chef Craig Koketsu, of New York City’s Quality Bistro. “This salad is sweet, salty, savory, and acidic. It’s so dynamic when you’re eating it, even though it’s all red.” Though it stands alone on Koketsu’s menu, we’ve topped our version with hanger steak for a quick weeknight dinner. While the steak cooks, the cabbage and beets marinate in a tangy mixture of Champagne vinegar and horseradish. Bleu d’Auvergne cheese is worth seeking out for its mild flavor.

Classic London Broil with Rosemary and Thyme

Red wine vinegar and Worcestershire sauce effortlessly infuse quick-cooking flank steak with bold flavor. Pile the thinly sliced steak on crusty rolls for sandwiches, or serve with buttery baked potatoes and a salad of crisp lettuces.

Green Curry Beef Skewers with Fried Basil Oil

Although green curry paste goes well with all types of meat, it brings out the best in red meat. I use beef here, but just as often I use boneless lamb from the leg. The basil oil is a finishing touch that perfumes the dish with the scent of Thai basil and provides richness. I call for quite a lot of curry paste here, but feel free to adjust the amount to suit your taste. Those who want it really hot may want to add more, but keep in mind that you will be introducing more salt to the dish, too, as commercial curry pastes tend to be salty. Look for a brand imported from Thailand, such as Mae Ploy or Nittaya. Lightly misting the basil leaves with water before you drop them in the hot oil will create crispy leaves that are vibrantly green—almost like stained glass—as opposed to dark brownish green.Reprinted with permission from Flavors of the Southeast Asian Grill: Classic Recipes for Seafood and Meats Cooked Over Charcoal by Leela Punyaratabandhu. Copyright ©2020 shesimmers.com. Photographs copyright ©2020 by David Loftus. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House.