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Chicken in a Pot with Lemon Orzo

This is not exactly the same as perhaps the most precious recipe in my repertoire, My Mother’s Praised Chicken, which found a home in my eighth book, Kitchen, but it owes a lot to it. A family favorite, it’s a simple one-pot dish which brings comfort and joy, and it is my pleasure to share that with you. It’s not in the spirit of things to be utterly specific with this kind of cooking: if you’re feeding small children, for example, you may not want to add the red pepper flakes. Similarly, you may want to use just one lemon, rather than the two I like. Your chicken may weigh more or less: the ones I get tend to be around 3½ pounds. And although I have specified the Dutch oven I always use, you obviously will use the one you have, which will make a difference to how quickly everything cooks, how much evaporation there will be, and so on. Don’t let these things trouble you unduly; this is a very forgiving dish. It doesn’t rely on precision timing: the chicken, leeks, and carrots are meant to be soft, and I even like it when the orzo is cooked far beyond the timing specified on the package. It’s also open to variation, owing to what’s in your kitchen. I could go on, but there is no need to add complications: this is a simple recipe that brings deep contentment.

Beef Wellington

Wrapped in golden, buttery puff pastry and filled with deeply savory mushroom duxelles, beef Wellington is an unforgettable centerpiece to any feast. Dried porcini deliver extra umami to the beef, while a touch of Dijon and chopped herbs adds a layer of freshness as well. Skipping the foie gras makes the dish more approachable, and swapping out the traditional crepe lining for phyllo (thanks to a trick from Kenji Lopez-Alt) streamlines the process, but beef Wellington still demands several hours of searing, stuffing, rolling, and chilling to ensure its magical result.

I Wasn't a Fan of Lamb Chops Until I Made These Lamb Chops

Rubbed with capers, anchovies, and garlic and paired with a salsa verde, reverse-seared double-cut lamb chops make for a low-lift weeknight meal that still feels fancy.

Schweinebraten (German Roast Pork Shoulder)

This classic German dish is all about the contrast between savory, fork-tender meat and a crispy, tender crust of pork crackling flavored with cumin, caraway, and mustard seeds. It’s worth your time to seek out a boneless pork shoulder with a nice, even fat cap, which is key to the dish. If the only pork shoulder available with a fat cap comes with a bone, you can ask the butcher to remove it or cut it out with a boning knife at home.
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Beef Bone Broth

This rich, long-simmered beef bone broth is terrific when used as stock in recipes, but is just as satisfying and delicious enough when enjoyed straight from a mug, gently warmed and topped with a bit of freshly ground pepper. You’ll want to make a trip to the butcher to find your soup bones, since they’ll need to be halved by the butcher with a bandsaw for maximum flavor in the broth.

Double-Cut Lamb Chops with Garlic-Caper Rub

Punchy anchovies and garlic mellow during their short cook time, adding umami to double-cut lamb chops. Reverse-searing using the broiler results in perfectly cooked lamb with a crispy exterior; use a probe thermometer to monitor the internal temperature for best results. Serve the carved chops over cooked orzo to balance out the meal. Christopher Bates of Element Winery in New York recommends a cool-climate Syrah from the Finger Lakes or Northern Rhône to pair with the lamb chops. "I love amplifying it with savory, briny flavors like capers,” says Bates.