The Best Cheese Knives of 2022

Our favorite is the Prodyne Multi-Use Knife.

In This Article

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Wüsthof Classic 3-Piece Cheese Knife Set
Sur La Table

There are few things that bring as much joy as a beautifully designed cheese board. I'd even consider it an art form, putting together an aesthetically pleasing platter of gooey brie, crumbly parmesan, firm manchego, and the sometimes-polarizing blue cheese. The ultimate accompaniment to the cheeseboard is the cheese knife, which can serve as both a decorative accessory and a functional tool.

From serrated knives to pronged cheese forks, there are a ton of options to choose from. We spoke to Jill Allen, Director of Product Excellence in Research & Development at Tillamook County Creamery Association about the importance of finding the right cheese knife.

"Cheese knives and tools are essential to properly cutting the perfect wedge of cheese," says Allen, who recommends matching the type of knife you use to the style of cheese you plan to eat. "Different types of knives are used to cut different styles and densities of cheeses, as to not damage or crush the structure and shape," she added.

To help you find the right set, we rounded up the best cheese knives you can buy online.

Best Overall

Prodyne CK-300 Multi-Use Cheese Fruit and Veggie Knife

Prodyne CK-300 Multi-Use Cheese Fruit and Veggie Knife

Amazon

Pros: A long blade makes it easy to cut into larger wheels of cheese, and the serrated edge is great for sawing through tough rinds.

Cons: The hollow edge could collect cheese residue, so be sure to wash thoroughly by hand in between each use.

Made from high-quality stainless steel, the Prodyne Multi-Use Cheese Knife has a 5.5-inch serrated edge to handle hard cheeses and an open-surface blade to keep meltier versions (like brie and burrata) from sticking. It's also designed with a forked tip to easily cut and serve chunks of semi-soft cheeses, like a cheddar or aged Gouda. The full tang blade makes this knife durable even when cutting into the hardest cheeses, and the plastic handle provides slip-free support. It's important to note that the extra nooks and crannies in this knife can collect cheese residue, so be sure to clean it thoroughly between each use.

Price at time of publish: $13

  • Dishwasher-safe: No
  • Material: Stainless steel blade with plastic handle
  • Pieces: 1

Best for Slicing

Boska Cheese Slicer with White Oak Handle

Boska Cheese Slicer with White Oak Handle

Sur La Table

Pros: The paddle design easily wedges firm cheeses, while the blade creates consistent slices in hard cheeses.

Cons: This knife isn't designed for all textures, so be careful when using it to spread super soft cheeses.

This professional-quality cheese slicer from Boska originates in the Netherlands, a country known for being the preeminent source of cheese tools and home of the original gouda cheese. Plus, Boska has been in the cutlery game for over a century, utilizing classic and timeless designs. The hand-polished white oak handle of this paddle-shaped knife is simple, elegant, and durable. The precision-crafted, stainless steel blade easily slices into many cheese textures—from semi-soft to firm. Keep in mind that unlike some other knives on this list, this knife is best for slicing or shaving cheeses, and it isn't as efficient at creating chunks of hard cheese or sawing through tough rinds.

Price at time of publish: $16

  • Dishwasher-safe: No
  • Material: Oak handle and stainless steel blade
  • Pieces: 1

Best for Soft Cheese

Laguiole Cheese Knives, Set of 3

Laguiole Cheese Knives, Set of 3

Pottery Barn

Pros: These handmade knives are dishwasher safe and come in a decorative box for safe keeping.

Cons: This set does not include a cheese slicer or shaver.

These handmade knives are individually polished and forged with stainless steel blades and olive wood handles. The three-piece set comes with a 4.5-inch knife and 2.5-inch spreader, both of which are ideal for handling softer cheeses. All three knives are housed in a decorative box with clear glass lid that makes for easy and safe storage. This is one of the only sets on our list that is dishwasher-safe.

Price at time of publish: $69

  • Dishwasher-safe: Yes
  • Material: Stainless steel blade with olive wood handle
  • Pieces: 4

Related: 13 Gorgeous Cheese Boards for Entertaining

Best Rustic

Sur La Table Silver Twig Soft Cheese Knife

Sur La Table Silver Twig Soft Cheese Knife

Sur La Table

Pros: We love the design, and the pronged tip and sharp blade make this a multifunctional option.

Cons: Although decorative, the thin handle on this knife could make it uncomfortable to hold and maneuver.

This pronged cheese knife is a multi-purpose tool that's ideal for cutting soft or semi-hard cheese and then picking up the piece to put on a cracker (or directly into your mouth—no judgement here). But the standout feature of this fork-tipped spear is the decorative silver branch handle. Simple and rustic, this style is also available as a flat knife version for hard cheeses, which is sold separately. Made from stainless steel, these knives are durable and reasonably priced. Be sure to hand wash to preserve shine and sharpness.

Price at time of publish: $10

  • Dishwasher-safe: No
  • Material: Stainless steel
  • Pieces: 1

Best Marble

Sur La Table Marble Cheese Knives, Set Of 3

Sur La Table Marble Cheese Knives, Set Of 3

Sur La Table

Pros: This versatile set of knives can handle a variety of different cheeses while serving as a decorative accessory.

Cons: These knives are not dishwasher-safe, and the marble handles are susceptible to stains.

If you're looking for a set of simple, versatile cheese knives that double as a decorative accessory, these three marble-handled blades are a good selection. The set includes a wide chisel knife, a cheese fork, and a small spade, which makes it a reliable pick for a variety of different types of cheeses. Keep in mind that these knives are not dishwasher-safe, and should be washed by hand to prevent any damage or discoloring to the marble.

Price at time of publish: $35

  • Dishwasher-safe: No
  • Material: Stainless steel blade with marble handle
  • Pieces: 3

Best Stainless Steel

Zwilling 3-Piece Cheese Knife Set

Zwilling 3-Piece Cheese Knife Set

Amazon

Pros: Long, ergonomically-designed handles make digging into harder blocks of cheese more comfortable.

Cons: These functional knives aren't particularly decorative and should be washed by hand.

Zwilling J.A. Henckels is known for making quality cutlery, and this set of durable, stainless steel knives does not disappoint. The longer handles are ergonomically designed so that your knuckles don't hit the board while cutting cheese. The set of three differently-shaped knives offers versatility and aims to meet a variety of cheese-slicing needs. The pronged, longer knife doubles as a cheese fork and helps slice through medium cheeses. The perforated knife prevents soft cheeses from sticking and the short, pointed knife has a sharp blade for breaking apart aged cheeses. Keep in mind that these knives aren't dishwasher-safe and hand washing is recommended.

Price at time of publish: $150

  • Dishwasher-safe: No
  • Material: Stainless steel
  • Pieces: 3

Related: These Are the Best Paring Knives for Every Home Cook

Best Gourmet Option

Wüsthof Gourmet Cheese Knife Set

Wüsthof Gourmet Cheese Knife Set

Sur La Table

Pros: This heavy-duty set comes with three super-sharp knives and a decorative box for easy storage.

Cons: It's by far the most expensive on our list, and the knives are not dishwasher-safe.

Wusthof's set of precision-forged knives feature bolstered handles that help ensure a balanced cutting experience and slip-free grip. This three-piece set from the brand's Gourmet line includes a soft cheese knife with a sharp, perforated blade to keep delicate cheeses from sticking, a hard cheese knife with a straight and sharp blade, and a cheese plane to thinly slice cheese. This set of stainless steel knives must be washed by hand.

Price at time of publish: $280

  • Dishwasher-safe: No
  • Material: High-carbon stainless steel
  • Pieces: 4

Related: The 14 Best Knife Block Sets Worth Buying, According to Thousands of Reviewers

Best Value

Freehawk Cheese Knives with Bamboo Wood Handle Steel

Freehawk Cheese Knives with Bamboo Wood Handle Steel

Amazon

Pros: This set offers a versatile array of functional knives at an affordable price.

Cons: Bamboo handles mean these knives must be washed by hand and shouldn't be soaked in water.

If you're looking for an affordable cheese knife set that comes with an array of knife styles, this option offers versatility and functionality. These stainless steel knives feature bamboo handles that are easy to hold and maneuver. The four-piece set includes a sharp tipped blade for slicing hard cheeses, two chisel knives for breaking off and spreading pieces of softer, crumbly cheeses, and a pronged fork for serving.

Price at time of publish: $9

  • Dishwasher-safe: No
  • Material: Stainless steel blades with bamboo handles
  • Pieces: 4

Conclusion

Allen says that cheese knives are more than an accessory — they're an essential tool that can make cutting and serving cheese easier. The Prodyne Multi-Use Knife (view at Amazon) combines durability and functionality, making for a versatile tool that can tackle a wide variety of cheeses no matter the shape or texture.

Factors to Consider

Types of Knives

While there are actually many different styles of cheese knives and some specially designed for particular cheeses, most households will do fine with a set of four standard styles. You want one paddle-style knife that also serves as a spreader for gooey cheeses. A basic sharp knife with a pointed tip for slicing cheeses like cheddar, swiss, or others. A flat shaving style slicer for making thin slices of semi-soft cheeses. And finally, a wide short wedge blade for creating craggy chunks of aged cheeses like old Gouda or Parmesan.

Material

Most cheese knives have stainless steel blades. These are best for cleaning and will also not have any reaction with the cheeses themselves. Carbon steel blades can react with acidic cheeses like pungent blues to create off-flavors and are more likely to rust. Ceramic blades are not recommended for harder cheeses as they can actually snap.

Cleaning and Care

Your best bet with cheese knives is to choose stainless steel knives with dishwasher-safe handles for ease of maintenance. If your cheese knives have wooden handles, you will want to wash by hand and dry immediately to protect the wood. As with any knife, sharpen regularly to keep them in good working order.

Pro-Panel Q+A

When it comes to cheese, you cannot get better than the cheeses from Jasper Hill Farm in Vermont. Their award-winning cheeses are served at some of the finest restaurants around the country and grace the best cheese counters. The company is deeply passionate about all things cheese, so when we needed an expert to talk to about knives, we immediately reached out to their Lifestyle Editor Lilith Spencer. And to our delight, we got a full Master Class in cheese knives!

Why are cheese knives different shapes?

"Each type of cheese knife has unique features that serve a particular function — the blades are different widths and thicknesses, some are atypically shaped, rounded, or pronged, not all of them are especially sharp (though some are very sharp), some even have holes in them, and then you have things like wire harps and special forks that aren't knives at all!" Says Spencer.

When to use which knife?

Spencer recommends the following:

"For very soft, gooey cheeses like Harbison or any other super-ripe soft cheese, your best bet is a spreader. These are pretty easy to identify in a set of cheese knives; they really look like they're made to spread stuff! My ideal cheese spreader has a thin blade but a broad surface — a thin blade makes it easy to get through the rind of a very soft cheese without just totally smooshing its paste, and a broad surface helps to actually pick up a generous dollop without it falling off the spreader.

For cheeses that are soft but not yet gooey, you may want to use a skinny, soft cheese knife. An offset handle makes it easy to cut all the way through the bottom rind without applying too much pressure, and the super-narrow shape minimizes contact between the cheese and the blade to prevent sticking when you pull away your portion.

Generally, semi-firm cheeses (i.e. tommes and young Goudas) and firm cheeses (i.e. alpines and non-crumbly cheddars) can utilize the same kinds of knives. You want something sharp and sturdy, but you don't have to use a cheese-specific knife here as long as it can easily slice through the rind. For truly hard cheeses — we're talking Parmigiano Reggiano, year-old Manchego, and extra-aged Goudas with lots of crystals — require less typical blades. This is when you want to use those spade-shaped blades or a wide, flat cheese knife.

Wire harps are useful for slicing up soft cheeses like young to medium-aged Brie as well as more delicate or crumbly blue cheeses if you plan on building a platter where all of the cheeses are pre-portioned."

Why do some cheese knives have holes?

"If you're serving semi-soft cheeses like Taleggio, younger bloomy rinds, or a fresh ball of mozzarella, that's when your holey cheese knife comes into play. The holes are there to help prevent these dense, creamy cheeses from sticking to the blade as you slice. Young, especially supple semi-firm cheeses like Fontina Val d'Aosta also benefit from this style of knife. Some of these holey knives also feature a pronged tip so that you can easily pick up the piece of cheese you've just sliced."

Our Expertise

For this piece, our food editors thoroughly researched available options, analyzed competitor recommendations, and consulted cheese expert Jill Allen, the Director of Product Excellence in Research & Development at Tillamook County Creamery Association. Jill has a Wisconsin State Cheese Graders License and holds the distinction of American Cheese Society Certified Cheese Professional.

This piece was also updated by Stacey Ballis, a freelance writer, recipe developer, and product reviewer. Ballis has been published in Food & Wine, Eating Well, Allrecipes, MyRecipes, Delish, and more.

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