Push the limits of flavor with our favorite finishing vinegars.

By Oset Babür
September 30, 2020
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Even the lightest drizzle of vinegar can add an unexpected dimension to a tried-and-true recipe, bringing a welcome punch of acid to a simple pan of roasted vegetables, an autumnal stew, or even a slice of pie à la mode. The bottles below—our favorites new and old—are sure to fuel hours of inspiration and experimentation in the kitchen.

Credit: Victor Protasio

Ramp Up Ramp Vinegar


Few plants have the cult following that ramps do, which is why this bottle made from fermented ramps is the ultimate host gift. Use it to add a tangy, peppery finish to crispy roasted potatoes, green beans, or spaghetti carbonara. $24 at rampupshop.com

Hanega Plum Vinegar


Gotham Grove founder Jiyun Jennifer Yoo reaches for this naturally fermented aged Korean plum vinegar as part of her go-to marinade with soy sauce and honey. It’s also perfect for adding delicate fruit notes to cocktails. $42 at gothamgrove.com

Noble Tonic 05 Finishing Vinegar


How many ingredients work as well on brussels sprouts as on ice cream? Aged in bourbon barrels and sweetened with maple syrup, this sherry vinegar’s oak and caramel notes make it extra versatile. $46 at store.177milkstreet.com

Credit: Victor Protasio

Acid League Garden Heat


This subtly spicy vinegar, made with carrots, celery, tomatoes, and jalapeños, is from the fermentation fanatics at Acid League. We’re using it to top off Mexican tortilla soup and as the secret (shh!) ingredient in our Bloody Marys. $15 at acidleague.com

Castelli Spicy White Balsamic Vinegar


Whenever red vinegar is too acidic for a dish, reach for this mild vinegar made with grapes grown in Modena—plus a hint of hot chile. It’s delicious drizzled on pizza and is great for macerating red onions. $25 at italianfoodandstyle.com

La Guinelle & Domaine Plageoles Mauzac Vin De Voile


Frenchette chefs Lee Hanson and Riad Nasr use this herbaceous, nutty vinegar, made from Domaine Plageoles’ Vin de Voile wine, on fish, fruit desserts, and in their beurre noisette. $30 at lecountry.store

Huilerie Beaujolaise Vinaigre De Calamansi


Chef Andrew Zimmern loves this vinegar made from sour-sweet calamansi citrus. Packed with acidity and sharpness, Zimmern uses it in hollandaise as well as lemon pastas and cold chicken salads. $40 at store.177milkstreet.com