I'm a father now, and here are the alcohol-related gifts I actually use.

By Mike Pomranz
June 09, 2020
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I’ve been a father for four years now, but I’ve been writing about beer professionally for over a decade. So I’ll admit it: I wrote Father’s Day gift guides when I wasn’t actually a father. Could I guess what fathers wanted? I tried. I have a father. I have friends who are fathers. And in many regards, a good gift is a good gift regardless of the holiday. Aren’t Father’s Day gifts just Christmas gifts that never sit under a tree?

Libbey

But this Father’s Day, I wanted to give a gift to all the people who are buying Father’s Day gifts: a Father’s Day gift guide written by a father who happens to write about alcohol for a living. You can be sure your father will love these gifts—I use all of these on a regular basis. Read on for a few I can highly recommend.

Insulated Cocktail Glasses  

The Duo Glass covers all the bases in one package. The ice balls from its mold settle harmoniously into the base, and the one-ounce line markers on the side make pouring any kind of drink a breeze. Together, these features are incredibly functional, but individually, the glass is also versatile. I love using the lines for straight whiskey pours, and the ice ball for chilling drinks in other glasses.

Aged & Ore Duo Glass, $48 at amazon.com

Wine Rack

JK Adams

Display-worthy wine racks with visual flair are fantastic for those pre-children days where you’re more concerned that a drunk dinner party guest will knock over your well-curated selection than an inadvertently thrown football. But when you’re a dad, you’re building a wine collection for an entire family. Fatherhood often pushes people from form back to function (just look at how Dad’s dressed!) so he needs a utilitarian wine rack: maximum storage, minimal space, a basic shape that can fit anywhere. And as a bonus, modular wine racks can be expanded later on—because just like with your family, though you may not be planning to have a lot more wine right now, you know it’s probably inevitable.

JK Adams Modular Wine Rack, $60-$170 at amazon.com or jkadams.com

Teku Stemmed Glasses

Teku

The shape and feel of the Teku glass truly enhance the drinking experience, but let me boil it down to one feature: Dad needs a stemmed beer glass. Why? Well, the old cliché is that Dad likes cold beer—so why is he gripping the side of his beer glass with his sweaty palm transferring heat and raising the temperature of the liquid? Even if he prefers his beer at proper serving temperature (as he should), a stemmed beer glass allows him to better control the temperature of his drink. Because when everything else around him is going crazy, it’s nice to know he has something under control—even if it’s just his beer temperature.

Rastal Teku 3.0 Glasses, Set of 2 $23 at tekuglass.com, Set of 6 $56 at amazon.com

Break-Resistant Beer Glasses

Libbey

You probably don’t put much thought into your most basic beer glasses, but here’s a true father tip: sometimes, you need plastic glassware. Namely, when you’re drinking around a four-year-old. I have a newfound appreciation for plastic cups that—though never as good as actual glass—come as close to replicating a good beer glass as possible. Granted, plastic glasses may not be a showstopper during unboxing, but they’re as practical as the ties of yore. Just make sure they’re big enough for a heavy pour.

Libbey Indoors Out Break-Resistant Craft Brews Pilsner Beer Glasses, 20-ounce, $26 at amazon.com or libbey.com