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The Tuk Tuk Sri Lankan Bites chef refuses to stay silent when she sees injustice, and that's a great thing for all of us.

March 19, 2021
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Sam Fore
Credit: Dennis Cahlo

Chefs and restaurant workers take great care of everyone else, but often they need a little help themselves. Each week, Food & Wine senior editor Kat Kinsman talks with hospitality pros about they manage their business, brain, and body for the long haul. Is there a topic you'd like to know more about or a guest you'd love to hear from? Tell us at fwpro@foodandwine.com or tweet to Kat @kittenwithawhip, and subscribe to the weekly Food & Wine Pro newsletter so you never miss an episode. Catch up on previous episodes here.

Episode 98 (Part 1): Sam Fore

When it comes to calling out cruddy behavior, chef Sam Fore has never been afraid to speak her mind. Growing up as a first-generation Sri Lankan American in North Carolina, she had a supportive community (and a mom who always warned her about how her mouth would get her in trouble—not that she listened) but outside of it, she began to question why the rules and standards were different for her than for her white peers. Fore's sense of justice and fearlessness has only strengthened over the years, and she joined Communal Table for a lively and frank discussion about growing up brown in the South, why it's important to question your preconceived notions, accidentally becoming a chef, and standing up for vulnerable people. 

Note: This is part one of a two-part conversation and includes a discussion of the murders of Asian American women in Atlanta this week.

Links and Resources

Follow: @tuktuklex