Clockwise from top left: Cedric Angeles; Eva Kolenko; Ricky Rhodes; Rebecca Stumpf; Justin T. Gellerson; Paul Quitoriano

In this special issue, we celebrate Gill and 30 more game-changing craftspeople who are reshaping cuisine in America and abroad by redefining ingredients, drinks, tools, restaurant design, and experiences.

Hunter Lewis
Updated February 22, 2019

Slice into Graison Gill’s Country boule from the cover of this issue and you’ll smell a nutty, almost molasses-like earthiness. Take a bite, and the dark brown, caramelized crust gives way to a tender, chewy, tangy crumb. How does Gill deliver such complex flavor with just flour, water, and salt? Good technique and a hot oven help, of course. So does a kicky sourdough starter. But the real difference-maker is more fundamental: Gill bakes with freshly milled flour. 


As writer Rowan Jacobsen details in “The Miller,” Gill fermented a whole-grain revolution in New Orleans when he brought a 3,000-pound stone mill to Bellegarde Bakery. His bakery created a new micro-economy in town, selling freshly milled heirloom grains to local chefs. It also linked him to a network of like-minded bakers, millers, and farmers across the country who are overhauling flour: the most commercial of ingredients which, until recently, hadn’t undergone the artisanal transformation that’s elevated foods like coffee, chocolate, and salt.“It’s all about flavor,” Gill said during a recent visit to Food & Wine’s Birmingham, Alabama, test kitchen. “Freshly milled flour simply tastes better.”


In this special issue, we celebrate Gill and 30 more game-changing craftspeople who are reshaping cuisine in America and abroad by redefining ingredients, drinks, tools, restaurant design, and experiences—and sometimes, like Gill, the supply chains that deliver them. As in-the-know consumers, you and I play a vital role in the equation, too. Support these makers and those in your community. Invest in an even more delicious future.

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