BBQ

Don't even get barbecue lovers started in a debate about this meat-centric food. What one fanatic in Texas holds as the ultimate recipe will completely differ from a great barbecue dish in North Carolina. Why? The definition of barbecue depends on where you go. Memphis favors dry rubs and cooking the meat in a big pit, while Kansas City is known for its thick, sweet, tomato-based sauces. Travel to the Carolinas, Texas and Alabama and you'll find even more variations. Whether you favor the vinegary pulled pork in North Carolina or the unique white sauce of Alabama, Food & Wine has all the delicious recipes you might want to try.

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Burnt Ends with Bourbon Sauce
Rating: Unrated 1
The crispy, caramelized "burnt" pieces of a smoked brisket are often the best part because the flavor is concentrated and the texture is pleasingly chewy. This recipe creates an entire baking tray of crispy pieces, so there are plenty to go around. Chef Matt Horn likes to serve these with slices of white bread; he shared his step-by-step process for making Burnt Ends with us, from seasoning the brisket to caramelizing the sauce on the cubed meat. If you spend a lot of time barbecuing, you will try out literally hundreds of rubs, not to mention cooking sauces, table sauces, mops, binders, and pastes. Eventually, you will settle on an all-purpose rub that adds loads of flavor to just about anything you put in the smoker. Horn Rub is chef Matt Horn's go-to rub; he keeps it close at hand at all time, and uses it to generously season these savory burnt ends. Instead of vinegar, Horn's thick, sticky Bourbon Sauce gets its kick from its namesake: bourbon. For a classic sauce with Kentucky roots, use dark molasses in place of the honey. This recipe works well with any type of barbecue, and Horn loves it in baked beans, too.
Smoked Brisket
This smoked brisket is self-taught barbecue expert Matt Horn's signature recipe — the star of the menu at his restaurant, Horn Barbecue, in Oakland, California. The 2021 Food & Wine Best New Chef spent weeks perfecting this recipe, and says time is the most important ingredient in this dish. You need to be patient while the meat's internal temperature rises to 203°F (95°C), but it's worth it when your smoked masterpiece is ready.
Spiced Sweet-and-Sour Ribs
Rating: Unrated 2
Rubbed with toasted ground spices then lacquered with a sweet and tangy glaze of maple syrup and a duo of vinegars, these meaty ribs have a deep flavor and an irresistibly crackly crust. To work ahead, you can roast the ribs the day before then glaze and broil them just before serving. Trimming the meat away from one end of each rib lets the meat pull away during cooking, creating handles that make for mess-free nibbling.
BBQ Menu Ideas
There's nothing more delicious than a barbecued meal. Here, we highlight a phenomenal barbecue shrimp bagna cauda with crudités, a special potato salad, chicken drumsticks with BBQ sauce and more.
Brisket-and-Mushroom Stew with Cheddar-Jalapeño Biscuits
Rating: Unrated 2
The beef for this simple stew marinates in red wine, garlic, sage and rosemary to help make it tender. Served with a dollop of cream, it’s an extremely luscious dish. Slideshow: More Beef Stew Recipes 
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Pulled Pork Sandwiches with Barbecue Sauce
Rating: Unrated 3435
Roasted garlic seasons this pork shoulder, which slow-cooks until tender and deeply flavorful. Shred it and top with barbecue sauce, coleslaw and a spicy habanero vinaigrette for the perfect sandwich. Slideshow:  How to Make Pulled Pork 
Sticky Barbecued Beef Ribs
Rating: Unrated 645
These beef ribs—leftovers from the giant rib roast—are incredibly luscious. Chef Tim Love douses them in his sweet and tangy homemade barbecue sauce, then cooks them on the grill until they're crusty, sizzling and outrageously good. More Recipes For Tailgating
Holiday Beef Brisket with Onions
Rating: 5 stars 2192

When Bruce Aidells was growing up, his family's Hanukkah-Christmas celebration always meant brisket, and this was one of their favorite ways to prepare it. Look for the leaner, flat-cut, or first-cut brisket with a layer of fat that's at least 1/8 inch thick. If you can't find a 6-pound piece, buy 2 smaller pieces. Like most braised dishes, this brisket is best made a day or two ahead.