Gin

Gin is a neutral grain spirit that is redistilled with botanicals, with the predominant flavor being juniper berries. Since every brand uses a differing combination of flavorings, gins are usually identified by their botanical profile. Besides juniper, common botanicals include angelica, coriander, orris root, orange peels and licorice. If you're looking to delve more into the world of gin, Food & Wine's guide explores its history, the best brands to try and great cocktail recipes that go beyond a G&T.

Most Recent

Rosy Hibiscus-Gin Lowball

On the fence when it comes to gin? Try a sip of this gateway cocktail. Known as sorrel in parts of Africa, roselle—the type of hibiscus used in most hibiscus teas—complements the floral notes of gin, resulting in a refreshing, balanced beverage. Stir leftover hibiscus tea into lemonade for a refreshing nonalcoholic sipper.

Third-Wave Swizzle

A swizzle stick is the key to a cold, well-mixed, frothy drink, but if you don’t have one on hand, you can use a long bar spoon to mix (although you won’t get as much frothing). To create the best froth and chill, rub the swizzle stick in between both hands to swish the stick back and forth in the cocktail.

Spiced Maple Gimlets

With warm, rounded flavors like maple syrup and sarsaparilla, this gin cocktail is comforting and deeply flavored, rather than light and aromatic.

More Gin

9 Great Gins for Summer Cocktails

Gin is back in a big way. Here are the best ones for your icy summer cocktails.

Martini Inverso

Bartender Sam Johnson turns the classic martini on its head, swapping dry sherry for vermouth and inverting its proportion to the gin. The result is briny and bone-dry and an excellent aperitif.    Slideshow: More Gin Recipes 

How to Make the Perfect Gin and Tonic, According to José Andrés

Plus, six spots in the United States where they put their own spin on the classic cocktail.