Classic Cocktails

Champagne Cocktail

From a perfectly balanced daiquiri to a refreshing mint julep, here are classic cocktail recipes.

01 of 08

Negroni

Negroni

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.

02 of 08

Martini

Martini

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman's 1904 American Bar.

03 of 08

Manhattan

Manhattan
© Wendell T. Webber

The earliest known printed recipe for the Manhattan was published in O. H. Byron's 1884 Modern Bartenders' Guide, which cites two versions: one made with French vermouth, the other with Italian.

04 of 08

Dark 'n Stormy

Dark & Stormy
© Wendell T. Webber

According to a Gosling's Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda's Royal Naval Officer's Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as "the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under."

05 of 08

Limoncello Collins

Limoncello Collins, Hatfields• Los Angeles
© Tina Rupp

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London's Limmer's Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that's extremely hard to find today.

06 of 08

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary, The Spotted Pig , New York City
© Tina Rupp

Bartender Anna Vanderzee suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

07 of 08

Daniel Boulud's Caipirinha

Daniel Boulud's Caipirinha
© Stephanie Foley

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. "It's more sophisticated than rum because it's more pure," says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

08 of 08

Hemingway Daiquiri

Hemingway Daiquiri
© Wendell T. Webber

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway "often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles."

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