Priya Krishna talks about cookbook writing, working with mom, and defying categorization.

By Kat Kinsman
August 08, 2019
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Chefs and restaurant workers take great care of everyone else, but often they need a little help themselves. Each week, Food & Wine senior editor Kat Kinsman talks with hospitality pros about they manage their business, brain, and body for the long haul. Is there a topic you'd like to know more about or a guest you'd love to hear from? Tell us at fwpro@foodandwine.com or tweet to Kat @kittenwithawhip, and subscribe to the weekly Food & Wine Pro newsletter.

Episode 24: Priya Krishna

When journalist Priya Krishna was writing a cookbook based on her Texas-dwelling Indian family, she knew she couldn't control where it was shelved or listed in stores. What she did have power over was where the title placed it in people's minds. The beloved and robustly-selling Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family is an homage to her boundary-busting, India-born mother Ritu and the dishes she adapted for her new homeland—as well as a beacon of solidarity to other first-generation kids who'd never seen themselves or their food represented in the media. "It feels like the dominant narrative is a very Western-centric one, so I feel like the biggest thing I can do is show that everyone has a different normal."

Buy Priya's book: Indian-ish

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