Challah Bread

Challah is not only delicious, its signature brown, glossy braid is a beautiful addition to any table. The bread is light and airy with a slightly sweet, rich flavor. It's not that hard to make and can fit in well at everything from an important holiday meal to an everyday dinner. Blogger Molly Yeh fills her challah with a combination of halvah and tahini to create a bread that's bursting with sesame flavor. Use Food & Wine's guide to find out how to bake your own loaf with tips for using it to make French toast, bread pudding, soufflés and more.

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Challah French Toast

A wonderfully decadent way to start the day is with French toast made with rich homemade challah. It's also a great use for any leftover challah you have. More Brunch Recipes

Jessamyn's Sephardic Challah

Jessamyn Waldman, founder of Hot Bread Kitchen, grew up in Canada eating challah, the Jewish Sabbath bread. Unlike the eggy challahs of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe, this version comes from the Sephardic Jews of the Mediterranean, who flavored their challahs with caraway and anise. Many challahs are braided, but this one is twisted into a round, turban-shaped loaf. More Breads from Around the World

How to Make Challah Bread

Jessamyn Waldman grew up in Canada eating challah, the Jewish Sabbath bread. Unlike the eggy challahs of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe, this version comes from the Sephardic Jews of the Mediterranean, who flavored their challahs with caraway and anise.

Halvah-Stuffed Challah

Rating: Unrated
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Blogger Molly Yeh fills this braided bread with a mix of halvah (the confection made with crushed sesame seeds and honey) and tahini. Yeh recommends using an extra-smooth, pourable tahini (Whole Foods’ 365 brand is a good bet), but if your tahini is cakey and thick, she advises mixing it with warm water until spreadable. Slideshow:  How to Make Challah Bread