Jewish Bread

The most notable types of Jewish bread are matzo and challah. While matzo is usually reserved for Passover, challah can be eaten during holidays, on the Sabbath or with an everyday meal. You'll often see it in its classic, free-standing, braided form, but it can also be shaped into loaves or rolls to use for sandwiches and toast. F&W's guide will introduce you to both these breads with easy-to-follow recipes and tips from expert bakers.

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Challah French Toast

A wonderfully decadent way to start the day is with French toast made with rich homemade challah. It's also a great use for any leftover challah you have. More Brunch Recipes

Chicken Soup with Rosemary Matzo Balls

At Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills, New York, chef Dan Barber prepares this soup with seasonal chicken (raised in late spring, summer and fall), using wings, backs, necks and feet. His recipe yields almost eight quarts of broth, so there's plenty to freeze. He likes serving the soup with fluffy matzo balls laced with rosemary. More Chicken Soup Recipes

Raisin-Walnut Babka

Pastry chef Melissa Weller of Sadelle’s in New York City swirls this light and buttery babka with a golden raisin puree, studs it with dark raisins and walnuts and tops it with a luscious cinnamon glaze. Slideshow: Cake Recipes 

Jessamyn's Sephardic Challah

Jessamyn Waldman, founder of Hot Bread Kitchen, grew up in Canada eating challah, the Jewish Sabbath bread. Unlike the eggy challahs of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe, this version comes from the Sephardic Jews of the Mediterranean, who flavored their challahs with caraway and anise. Many challahs are braided, but this one is twisted into a round, turban-shaped loaf. More Breads from Around the World

Whole-Grain Matzo

Cookbook author Marcy Goldman started baking matzo with her young sons after touring a temporary factory at a local synagogue that produced shmura matzo—the traditional, handmade variety. "As a baker and a Jewish mother, I thought, I can do that," she says. The whole-grain flours in this recipe create a more crackly, sandy texture than white-flour matzo. More Passover Recipes

How to Make Challah Bread

Jessamyn Waldman grew up in Canada eating challah, the Jewish Sabbath bread. Unlike the eggy challahs of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe, this version comes from the Sephardic Jews of the Mediterranean, who flavored their challahs with caraway and anise.

More Jewish Bread

Halvah-Stuffed Challah

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Blogger Molly Yeh fills this braided bread with a mix of halvah (the confection made with crushed sesame seeds and honey) and tahini. Yeh recommends using an extra-smooth, pourable tahini (Whole Foods’ 365 brand is a good bet), but if your tahini is cakey and thick, she advises mixing it with warm water until spreadable. Slideshow:  How to Make Challah Bread