Beans + Legumes



According to chef Dan Barber, "Everyone should be eating more beans." They also help create nutrient-rich soil by storing nitrogen in their roots. "Peas and peanuts perform this neat trick as well," he adds. And if the environmental impact isn't enough to sway you, beans and legumes are downright delicious, too. F&W's guide gives you tips for preparing all the different varieties, from canned to dry, and offers plenty of enticing recipes.

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Korean Barbecued Tofu
Chicago chef Bill Kim created this recipe for his cookbook, Korean BBQ, to show how well tofu takes on flavors when marinated and grilled. He uses his Korean BBQ Sauce as a marinade, adding a jolt of spice with sambal oelek and light fruit flavors with kiwi and Asian pear. The Blackening Seasoning used to season the tofu before it is grilled balances chili powder with sweet paprika. Save any leftover Blackening Seasoning and BBQ Sauce to use on grilled tofu or meat.
Jamaican Stew Peas Put a New Spin on How I See My Mother-in-Law
Brigid Ransome Washington grew up in Trinidad and Tobago eating kidney beans the way her mother made them, but learning her Jamaican mother-in-law's method changed her perspective of the dish, and the woman who was teaching her.
Jamaican Stew Peas and Spinners
Red kidney beans, aromatics, coconut milk, a Scotch Bonnet pepper, and more come together in these Jamaican Stew Peas and Spinners, which writer Brigid Ransome Washington developed based on her mother-in-law's recipe. While the iterations Ransome Washington enjoyed growing up in Trinidad and Tobago included meat, this version is vegan, but make no mistake, it's still luscious, hearty, and satisfying. Don't throw away the soaking liquid from the beans—according to Vivienne, her mother-in-law (who she calls Auntie), simmering the beans in it gives the dish a beautiful color. The resulting Stew Peas are hearty, comforting, and filled with earthy and bright flavors. READ: Jamaican Stew Peas Put a New Spin on How I See My Mother-in-Law
These are the Types of Tofu Should You Use: A Beginner's Guide
Crispy, chewy, stretchy, squeaky, crumbly, spongy, and silky, tofu is the ultimate shape-shifter.
Loaded Pita Nachos with Lentil Chili and Feta Queso
Rating: Unrated 1
In this recipe for plant-based nachos, pita chips are drizzled with a feta queso and then laden with lentil chili, harissa-spiked pickled cabbage, and a dollop of creamy labneh. Make the chips, queso, and cabbage ahead of time to help this dish come together easily, or use store-bought pita chips, if desired. The tangy feta queso gets its smooth body from the addition of red lentils and is a versatile ingredient on its own, says Cassie Piuma of Sarma in Somerville, Massachusetts: "We use this queso in mac and cheese and sub it in as a sauce for eggplant parm or moussaka."
Tofu Skin Stir-Fry
When it's dried, tofu skin (doufu pi in Mandarin, yuba in Japanese) becomes earthy and chewy. It's sold in many shapes and is hardy enough to withstand braises, bold sauces, and stir-fries, mimicking the texture of shredded meat. In this recipe, dried tofu skin sticks are broken into pieces, rehydrated until pliable, and then stir-fried and with an umami-rich chile oil and soy sauce.
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More Beans + Legumes

Rajma (Kidney Bean Curry) Tacos
This creamy, richly spiced vegetarian kidney bean curry is usually served over rice with roti or naan, but it also makes a surprisingly delicious filling for corn tortillas. You can assemble the tacos before serving them, or make a giant taco platter with the rajma, toasted tortillas, and all of the toppings and let your guests build their own to their own liking. 
Rajma (Kidney Bean Curry)
Rating: Unrated 1
This rich, creamy kidney bean curry, packed with layers of flavor from oil-bloomed spices and sauteed onion, can be enjoyed over rice with roti or naan for scooping. Add a dollop of tomato achaar or roasted garlic achaar for a little heat and acidity, and the yogurt for creamy coolness. Finish with a small handful of chopped onions and fresh cilantro for a final pop of flavor. If you don't have amchoor powder, you can try a bit of tamarind concentrate or a squeeze of lemon juice instead.
Smoky Simmered Beans with Sofrito
Rating: 3.5 stars 2

The foundation of flavor for these savory, creamy beans comes from sofrito, a base of sauteed aromatics that Diaz grew up eating thanks to her Puerto Rican family. You will produce more sofrito than needed for this recipe, but you can store additional sofrito in the fridge for up to 1 week, or in the freezer for up to 3 months. Use it as a base for soups, stews, and other bean dishes. Note: If using home-cooked beans instead of canned, you may need 1/2 to 1 cup of additional broth.