Ted Allen

A classic bouillabaisse often contains six or more different kinds of fish. "But for my money, you really just need lobster, a firm fish and either mussels or clams," says Ted Allen. Even in a simplified version of the Provençal seafood stew, Allen still thinks it's important to make a broth; here, he uses the lobster shells. "For a stronger seafood flavor, add a bottle of clam juice to the finished stock," he says. Chef Coverage from F&W Editors  More French Dishes
Advertisement
Grape tomatoes sautéed with capers, shallot and cumin form a bright, chunky sauce for seared salmon. The recipe is from Ted Allen's cookbook, The Food You Want to Eat. In 2018, Food & Wine named this recipe one of our 40 best: Whenever a recipe is tested at F&W, the team gathers round to sample and discuss it. This unassuming salmon didn't really grab anyone's attention while it sat on the table, but once it was tasted, everyone paused and quieted. It was disarmingly simple but perfect. To make it, Ted Allen, TV personality and host of Food Network's Chopped, sautéed sweet grape tomatoes with capers, shallot, and cumin, then spooned the bright, chunky sauce over crisp salmon fillets. It's easy and quick and makes the quintessential weeknight dinner.
In the spring, beets are often sold at farmers' markets with their greens still attached. For this hearty salad, Ted Allen roasts the beets with garlic to make a creamy vinaigrette, then wilts the beet greens to toss with the asparagus salad. If you can't find beet greens, Swiss chard is an excellent substitute. Slideshow:  Make-Ahead Picnic Salads