Robin Bashinsky

Misubi, the beloved Hawaiian snack made of Spam, sushi rice, and nori, happens to be a perfect party appetizer. In this version, sticky, sweet ham replaces the Spam, and is topped with a vibrant pineapple salsa. When cutting the pineapple for the salsa, don't be delicate—give it a good mashing to release juices and reduce the cooking time, keeping the flavors bright. If you can, use a cutting board with a small moat around the edges to catch the pineapple juices, then add them to the pot with the pineapple. The pineapple salsa would also be great with a bowl of chips or spooned on top of tacos.
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To create a vegetarian lasagna that’s packed with flavor (rather than watery and bland), start by roasting mushrooms and red peppers with a quick garlic-infused oil. While the vegetables are cooking, stir together a quick ricotta filling with plently of Parmesan for extra umami. Using no-boil lasagna noodles and good-quality store-bought tomato sauce cut down on cook time without sacrificing taste.Related: More Lasagna Recipes
This all-in-one dinner starts out minimalist—just chicken pieces and zucchini and shallot chunks, tossed with the usual suspects (olive oil, salt, and pepper) before roasting. But as the chicken and vegetables brown beautifully in the oven, you make the most of your time, prepping a herb-packed, garlic-spiked cherry tomato relish. The final trick? Using that relish to deglaze the sheet pan after it comes out of the oven, making the most of the savory pan juices, blunting the bite of the vinegar and garlic, and softening the tomatoes just enough to bloom all the flavors. Related: More Chicken Recipes
This creamy, savory one-pot pasta dish comes together without the need to boil the pasta separately. Savory sautéed mushrooms and gently sweet leeks combine with cream, lemon juice, and white wine to create the rich sauce. Feel free to switch up the flavor by adding tarragon instead of dill. Related: More One-Pot Recipes
Mexican Street Taco Soup
Rating: Unrated
1
Shortcut alert—chorizo is your ticket to a fast-fix dinner thanks to its built-in abundance of spices. In this easy soup, it provides a backbone of flavor without requiring you to raid your spice cabinet. Customize this recipe with your choice of beans—we love creamy pinto, but black beans are equally delicious. Pile a bowl full of your favorite toppings and dive in; it’s much easier to eat than a street taco, and just as delicious! Be sure to buy Mexican chorizo, which is uncooked; Spanish chorizo is cured, so it won’t render the fat you need to cook the onions and chiles.
Fresh ingredients team up with store-bought shortcuts to get this comforting dinner on the table in just over 30 minutes. Frozen cheese tortellini only need a 5-minute dip in the simmering broth to cook up perfectly. Don’t be tempted to just dump the whole can of tomatoes into the pot; draining them first concentrates the flavor.
Learn how to grill a whole flatfish, such as sole, fluke, or flounder, and serve it with a simple lemon-herb butter.
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Crackling Pork Loin
Rating: Unrated
New!
Jaw-dropping centerpiece dishes require two essentials: salt and time.  Preseasoning is the simplest thing you can do to make a good piece of meat great.  Given enough time to penetrate tissue, salt works flavor magic: It denatures proteins, breaking up their molecular strands into shorter amino acids—among them an abundance of glutamic acid, the essence of umami—to release a complex symphony of savory flavors. It requires a long cooking time to fully render the fat cap and cook a pork loin, which can result in a dry piece of meat if you’re not careful. A wet brine ensures that the meat stays tender and succulent, while the addition of kombu and bonito flakes lend a delicate smokiness to the meat. We love the rich marbling and quality of Snake River Farms’ Kurobuta rack of pork.
The Snappiest Shrimp
Rating: Unrated
2
Head-on shrimp are a crowd-pleasing centerpiece, but are easy to overcook and a pain to peel at the table. To make it easier, brine raw shrimp in a slushy solution of sea salt and baking soda. Alkaline baking soda slightly alters the pH of the shrimp, making them as plump and succulent as lobster and resistant to overcooking. The brine also causes the meat to pull away from the shells while cooking, so you get all the great flavor of shell-on shrimp without the hassle.
Learn how to grill a whole flatfish, such as sole, fluke, or flounder, and serve it with a simple lemon-herb butter.
Crackling Pork Loin
Rating: Unrated
New!
Jaw-dropping centerpiece dishes require two essentials: salt and time.  Preseasoning is the simplest thing you can do to make a good piece of meat great.  Given enough time to penetrate tissue, salt works flavor magic: It denatures proteins, breaking up their molecular strands into shorter amino acids—among them an abundance of glutamic acid, the essence of umami—to release a complex symphony of savory flavors. It requires a long cooking time to fully render the fat cap and cook a pork loin, which can result in a dry piece of meat if you’re not careful. A wet brine ensures that the meat stays tender and succulent, while the addition of kombu and bonito flakes lend a delicate smokiness to the meat. We love the rich marbling and quality of Snake River Farms’ Kurobuta rack of pork.
The Snappiest Shrimp
Rating: Unrated
2
Head-on shrimp are a crowd-pleasing centerpiece, but are easy to overcook and a pain to peel at the table. To make it easier, brine raw shrimp in a slushy solution of sea salt and baking soda. Alkaline baking soda slightly alters the pH of the shrimp, making them as plump and succulent as lobster and resistant to overcooking. The brine also causes the meat to pull away from the shells while cooking, so you get all the great flavor of shell-on shrimp without the hassle.
Roasted Side of Salmon
Rating: Unrated
4
Jaw-dropping centerpiece dishes require two essentials: salt and time.  Preseasoning is the simplest thing you can do to make a good piece of seafood great.  Given enough time to penetrate tissue, salt works flavor magic: It denatures proteins, breaking up their molecular strands into shorter amino acids—among them an abundance of  glutamic acid, the essence of umami—to release a complex symphony of savory flavors. Fish, like salmon, only require a short brine because their shorter muscle fibers break down and absorb seasoning more quickly than red meat.  Brining also minimizes the appearance of the white protein called albumin that appears on the surface of cooked fish. The added water content helps keep the fish from overcooking, even if it roasts for a minute too long.