Photo of Paige Grandjean
Photo of Paige Grandjean

Paige Grandjean

Title:  Associate Food Editor

Location: Birmingham, Alabama

Education: Wine & Spirit Education Trust Level 2 Award in Spirits
International Association of Culinary Professionals Cookbook Judge- Baking Category 2021

Expertise: Recipe Development, Food Styling

Paige Grandjean is a food editor, recipe developer, and food stylist with over seven years of experience in food media. Her work has appeared in more than 15 nationally distributed publications, award-winning cookbooks, and digital platforms.

Experience: Paige Grandjean has spent her entire career in food media. As a former recipe tester and developer in the Meredith Food Studios, she worked on recipes for numerous print and digital brands. Her extensive test kitchen experience landed her a spot as a panel speaker at the International Association of Culinary Professionals annual conference in 2020. Paige's recipes have been showcased on the covers of magazines such as Food & Wine, Southern Living, and Cooking Light, with her 2020 Food & Wine lamination cover story earning a spot as a Folio: Eddie and Ozzie Award finalist. As the current associate food editor for Food & Wine, Paige assists in overseeing all food content for the internationally acclaimed brand.
Homemade Fresh Ricotta
Rating: Unrated
1
This easy homemade fresh ricotta cheese recipe only requires three ingredients—milk, buttermilk, and salt—and yields a light, fluffy ricotta that's a delicious blank canvas for sweet or savory recipes, or you can enjoy it as a decadent toast topper. Source high-quality local dairy if possible for the richest flavor and best results. 
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This classic baking vessel is the secret to perfectly crispy sourdough.
Homemade ricotta takes spring cooking to the next level.
These savory, cheesy, herb-flecked Italian dumplings are a simple and elegant early spring dinner. The fresh ricotta and parmesan gnudi are buried in semolina flour overnight (or up to a few days), which allows a thin skin to form around each dumpling. That skin helps these delicate dumplings hold their shape while they simmer. 
This velvety-smooth, berry-topped mousse requires very little time to make – it comes together in just 15 minutes, and then needs just an hour in the refrigerator to firm up.  Ricotta cheese, quickly whipped in a food processor with honey and vanilla, forms the base of the mousse. Folding whipped cream into the ricotta yields a luscious, velvety dessert. With a recipe like this one that calls for just a few ingredients, it's important to use the best you can find. Start with homemade ricotta, or the best, freshest ricotta you can find at the store or farmer's market. Then, to complement the subtly milky, pleasantly grassy flavor of that ricotta, use a mild clover honey. The honey-ricotta mousse is a beautiful canvas for all kinds of toppings. Here, it's garnished with crunchy sliced toasted almonds and juicy fresh strawberries and a final drizzle of honey, but it's adaptable to what's in season or what you like best: you can substitute sweet orange segments or jammy figs for the strawberries, change up the honey drizzle with maple syrup, or try another crunchy topping, like your favorite granola or crushed pistachios, in place of the sliced almonds.
A little extra hands-off pressing time firms up fresh ricotta into a block that can be cut into paneer-like cheese. Fried in ghee, the crispy, cheesy cubes transform into cheese croutons and are a perfect pair for the warm puree of chile-and-ginger-spiked spinach and cilantro.
Take a little soppressata, some chopped calabrian chiles, and a drizzle of hot honey, and you'll end up with the pizza of the moment. Calabrian chiles, fiery chiles from Italy, add heat and a distinctly fruity flavor to this pie. The hot honey mirrors the flavors of the chiles, and adds a touch of sweetness. 
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It's important not to weigh your pizza down with too many toppings, which can make for a soggy pie, so this pizza only requires a small amount of wild mushrooms. Choose whatever looks best at the market. That said, we love this pizza with a drizzle of Fancy Ranch dressing (which almost makes it a salad, right?) Fancy Ranch is a homemade ranch dressing gussied up with a few chopped briny anchovies. But why stop with just a drizzle when you can also serve the pizza with a small bowl of the dressing alongside for dipping?
The combination of the meaty, briny, vegetal flavors in this pizza hits so many satisfying notes that it is sure to be a hit at your table. The olives, peppers, sausage, and ricotta combine to bring sweet, savory, salty, and creamy notes to this pretty pizza. Bright green and meaty Castelvetrano olives offer a refreshing upgrade from the standard canned black olives served at many pizzerias, and mirror the Mediterranean seasoning in the crumbled Italian sausage generously topping this pizza.
Take a little soppressata, some chopped calabrian chiles, and a drizzle of hot honey, and you'll end up with the pizza of the moment. Calabrian chiles, fiery chiles from Italy, add heat and a distinctly fruity flavor to this pie. The hot honey mirrors the flavors of the chiles, and adds a touch of sweetness. 
It's important not to weigh your pizza down with too many toppings, which can make for a soggy pie, so this pizza only requires a small amount of wild mushrooms. Choose whatever looks best at the market. That said, we love this pizza with a drizzle of Fancy Ranch dressing (which almost makes it a salad, right?) Fancy Ranch is a homemade ranch dressing gussied up with a few chopped briny anchovies. But why stop with just a drizzle when you can also serve the pizza with a small bowl of the dressing alongside for dipping?
The combination of the meaty, briny, vegetal flavors in this pizza hits so many satisfying notes that it is sure to be a hit at your table. The olives, peppers, sausage, and ricotta combine to bring sweet, savory, salty, and creamy notes to this pretty pizza. Bright green and meaty Castelvetrano olives offer a refreshing upgrade from the standard canned black olives served at many pizzerias, and mirror the Mediterranean seasoning in the crumbled Italian sausage generously topping this pizza.
It may seem like a crazy idea, but doubling the carbs on this pizza is one delicious way to serve up a pie. This pizza starts with the flavors of the classic Alsatian pizza, made with cremé fraîche, caramelized onion, and bacon, and adds soft confit garlic cloves and thin slices of potatoes. A little greenery from kale and chives, and you've got an exceptional pizza to both look at and eat. 
Classic Cheese Pizza
Rating: Unrated
New!
Sometimes all you want at the end of the day is a simple cheese pizza. This recipe turns simple into sublime with the addition of an exceptional pizza dough, low-moisture mozzarella cheese, and an easy to make tomato sauce that hits all of the right sweet and savory notes to marry all of the flavors in this pie. A simple garnish of fresh herbs, and you've got perfection on a plate.
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Artisan Pizza Dough
Rating: Unrated
3
Despite its reputation as a convenience food, the most essential element of great pizza is time. A slow fermentation gives our pizza dough its chewy-crispy texture and depth of flavor. It starts with your choice of sourdough starter (aka levain) or a simple mixture of flour, water, and active dry yeast (poolish) left to ferment for 12 hours. Both options start fermentation and build flavor in the dough overnight. Strategic stretching of the dough during the initial fermentation stage develops gluten and makes the dough evenly elastic and forgiving to work with. Each 9-ounce dough ball will make one 10-inch pizza, a personal-size pie that's also easy to maneuver around home countertops and ovens. This overnight dough is easily doubled for pizza parties. Not cooking for a crowd? The raw dough may be frozen. 
Three-Cheese Queso Nachos
Rating: Unrated
New!
Whether you're making this loaded tray of nachos for entertaining or the ultimate snack dinner, it's sure to impress. Each individual component takes this dish to the next level, from homemade pickled red onions and jalapeños to creamy queso made with Monterey Jack, white American, and goat cheese. A few special tricks make these nachos even better. First, for optimal melting, shred the cheese by hand instead of buying pre-shredded. When you build the nachos, make sure you layer the toppings evenly, so there are beans and queso in every bite. To make these nachos vegetarian, skip the chorizo and add a pinch of cumin and smoked paprika to the beans, or substitute in Soyrizo. Save any leftover pickled onions for tacos, sandwiches or salads.
Charred and stuffed, New Mexico’s signature pepper takes chiles rellenos to the next level.
New Mexico Red Chile Sauce
Rating: Unrated
New!
Vibrantly red with mild piquancy and earthiness from New Mexico dried chile powder and ground cumin, this chile sauce is the perfect balance to the cheesy, fried relleno, simple fried eggs, or tacos.
Hatch Chiles Rellenos
Rating: Unrated
New!
Hatch chiles stand out for their balanced sweet heat that takes on a subtle smokiness and buttery quality once roasted. Here, recipe developer Paige Grandjean (whose aunt married into the Franzoy family, who first commercialized Hatch chiles in the early 1900s) uses the roasted chiles to make Hatch chiles rellenos, oozing with asadero cheese. Whipped egg whites give the simple batter a delicate structure; it fries up golden brown and airy, encasing the flavorful Hatch chiles. Fold the egg whites into the batter just before frying to keep it nice and fluffy. Try this with Grandjean's quick and easy homemade red chile sauce.
These lightly spiced, fruity vegan cupcakes have a tender and delicate crumb with a soft texture from the full-fat oat milk and a blend of baking soda and baking powder. The frosting is soft after beating but will pipe beautifully and is surprisingly stable. Its bright lemon flavor and light, melt-in-your-mouth quality are similar to Swiss or Italian meringue buttercreams.
A mix of unsweetened cocoa and bittersweet chocolate bars gives these fudgy cookies a deep chocolate flavor. Dark rye flour adds a lightly savory note that balances the sweet intensity of dark chocolate well and plays off the crunchy sea salt garnish. The addition of light brown sugar makes these cookies extra chewy and helps to extend their shelf life. Don't skip the chilling time; the dough will be soft when first mixed and will spread too much if baked immediately. The cookies are a treat on their own, but they can also be filled with Vegan Vanilla Bean Ice Cream to make vegan ice cream sandwiches. (To assemble, scoop about 1/3 cup ice cream onto flat side of 1 cooled cookie; top with a second cookie, flat side down. Wrap in plastic wrap; freeze until ice cream is firm, about 30 minutes. Serve immediately, or freeze up to 3 days.)
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Vegan Vanilla Bean Ice Cream
Rating: Unrated
New!
After meticulous testing, the Food & Wine test kitchen discovered the surprising key ingredient for the creamiest vegan ice cream: pea milk. With the right balance of unsaturated fat and protein and a relatively mild, neutral flavor, it's the perfect base for this sweet, vanilla-flavored treat. Xanthan gum doesn't require heat to activate its thickening properties; it starts working as soon as it touches liquid, so the ice cream base will be slightly gelatinous after chilling. Whisk it well to create the best texture before churning. This vegan ice cream is a treat on its own, but is also lovely atop vegan Sour Cherry and Black Pepper Pie, or as a filling for vegan ice cream sandwiches using Double-Chocolate Rye Cookies.
Chilling pie dough is standard practice, but it's especially important for this recipe because vegan butters remain soft even at cooler temperatures. The pie crust is flaky and tender, while the sweet-tart cherry filling gets a mild warmth from black pepper. Bake the pie on a preheated baking sheet to help the bottom crust cook through and to catch any syrupy filling that bubbles over during baking. If you like, serve slices topped with a scoop of Vegan Vanilla Bean Ice Cream.
Let the farmers market be your guide when it comes to this cobbler—any mixture of fresh summer stone fruits and berries can be cooked down to make the perfectly sweet-tart, jammy filling. Aim for 2 1/2 pounds (about 10 cups) of fruit total, using any combination of the following: blackberries, blueberries, or raspberries; Bing or Rainier cherries (stem and pit them first); stone fruit (pitted and sliced into 3/4-inch wedges; you can leave the skin on plums or apricots but should peel peaches and nectarines). Tender vanilla-mascarpone biscuits have a shortcake-like texture and a delightfully crunchy top from the turbinado sugar. They're also highly customizable: You can swap the mascarpone in the biscuit topping for crème fraîche or sour cream if that's what you have, and trade the semolina for fine cornmeal for a more crumbly texture.
These sweet and tangy Strawberry Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting pair juicy, fresh berries with vibrantly colored and concentrated freeze-dried strawberries for the ultimate summer treat. Processing the dried strawberries with a touch of sugar helps to keep them from clumping together so they evenly disperse in the batter. A simple, not-too-sweet cream cheese frosting keeps these moist and tender cakes well-balanced and beautifully decorated.
Lobster Thermidor
Rating: Unrated
2
Classic lobster thermidor stuffs gently cooked lobster meat back in its shell with a wine-based sauce and a touch of cheese before coming together under the broiler. The natural sweetness of lobster still shines through the rich, but not heavy, cremini mushroom and dry Sherry laced creamy sauce. A touch of cayenne adds warmth, not spice, that brightens the whole dish, while Parmesan cheese gets bubbly and brown under the broiler to finish each impressive stuffed lobster tail. 
Nutty whole wheat flour, fluffy ricotta, and tender cooked quinoa add flavor and texture to these light pancakes, due to the clever addition of whipped egg whites. Lemon zest, vanilla, and maple syrup add just enough sweetness to balance the slightly bitter quinoa. Choose a creamy, whole-milk ricotta here, the finer curd incorporates best into this batter, adding moisture and richness without a grainy texture.
Burnt ends are, strictly speaking, the extra-dark, chewy, extremely delicious ends of a barbecued beef brisket—not pork belly at all. But if you find burnt ends irresistible, then this recipe is for you. Slow-smoking chunks of spice-rubbed pork belly, then tossing them in a quick, not-too-sweet barbecue sauce and smoking them some more yields a crispy-chewy pile of pork that will win over the most passionate burnt-ends purist. Enjoy them with piles of white bread to sop up the sauce, along with tangy pickles and raw onion to cut through the richness.