Marianne Williams

The Philadelphia roast pork sandwich combines roasted pork with melty provolone cheese and broccoli rabe (or sometimes spinach) for a seriously satisfying bite. For this version, we sautéed broccoli rabe with plenty of garlic and some crushed red pepper flakes, and finished it with fresh lemon juice. Its bitterness and brightness balances the fattiness of the pork, which is incredibly tender and buttery with a flavorful crust. Letting the pork sit at room temperature for an hour while the oven preheats helps ensure it cooks evenly. Roasting it initially at 450°F and then lowering the oven temperature crisps and renders the fat on top, and then slowly cooks the meat. The provolone brings sharpness and helps keep the bottom of the roll from getting too soggy, and the mayo — which has a punch of acidity from pickled pepperoncini and its brine — is the finishing touch.
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The pepperoni roll is a West Virginian lunch or snack in which spicy, garlicky pepperoni is stuffed inside a soft yeasted bread roll. When it bakes, the oil from the pepperoni seeps into the bread for delicious results. Adding cheese is optional — we've gone for provolone here, whose salty, mildly sweet flavor balances the pepperoni beautifully (not to mention, it gets nice and melty too). The roll itself also has some sweetness from honey. We're serving the pepperoni rolls appetizer-style with marinara sauce on the side that's been bolstered with caramelized baked garlic and salty anchovies. Add them to the menu for your next party or tailgate.
A homemade Creole spice blend adds a piquant kick to these salmon croquettes, which are crispy on the outside and tender and flaky on the inside. Refrigerating the patties until they're firm before dredging and cooking helps them keep their shape. If you'd like, you can swap in an equal amount of leftover cooked salmon for the fresh fillets to save time. The Creole Aïoli — starring finely chopped cornichons and their brine, Creole mustard, and a hint of sugar — is an irresistible combination of creamy, crunchy, and salty, and an ideal match for the croquettes.
These showstopping lamb burgers have salty and briny capers studded throughout them, and get some earthy notes from cumin. The accompanying feta-yogurt spread is the perfect match: It's creamy and salty, but also has freshness from mint and a hint of warmth from ground nutmeg. Spreading it on both the top and bottom brioche buns envelopes the burgers from both sides and helps hold the burger, red onion, arugula, and cucumber together. If you'd like, serve the burgers with sweet potato fries to round out the meal.
Air Fryer Basque Cheesecake
Rating: Unrated
New!
Air fryers can be used to make everything from crispy coconut shrimp to fudgy brownies; here, we're using one to whip up a quick version of a Basque cheesecake. Evenly browned with a creamy, silky, smooth center, this cheesecake boasts just the right amount of sweetness to contrast the bitter burnt top.  Drizzling honey on top of the cake after baking adds an extra layer of warm sweetness, making this dessert feel that much more decadent.
Brushing these pork chops with a maple syrup-soy sauce mixture before cooking them in the air fryer results in some delicious charring around the edges. You'll need to cook the pork chops in two batches, so be sure to keep your oven on 200°F so you can keep the first two chops warm while the remaining two are in the air fryer. The pork chops also get a light coating of maple-soy glaze before going in the oven, which has an extra punch of flavor thanks to rice vinegar and Sriracha. Homemade, vibrant pickled red onions top the finished chops — feel free to use store-bought if you'd like to save time. Serve the pork chops over a bed of creamy polenta or mashed potatoes, and top with the remaining glaze and the pickled onions.
Air Fryer Coconut Shrimp
Rating: Unrated
1
Coconut shrimp are well suited to all sorts of dipping sauces, but we keep it simple here and use Thai sweet chili sauce spruced up with a little chopped fresh cilantro. Using an air fryer instead of frying in oil on the stovetop means crispy shrimp without any splatters to clean up afterwards. Serve the shrimp as an appetizer, or turn them into dinner along with rice and baby bok choy sautéed in toasted sesame oil and fresh ginger.
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In this nearly hands-free version adapted from Khoa Tran's family recipe, sweetened condensed milk tames yogurt's assertive tang, producing a silky-smooth yogurt using a convenient multicooker. Instead of being overly sweet, this yogurt is perfectly balanced and can be used in sweet or savory recipes. Tran's recipe cleverly calls for using the leftover condensed milk can for measuring; this version has been standardized for a larger yield.
Multiple factors take this umami-rich gravy to the next level, from the caramelized mushrooms to the herb "whisk" used to impart a fresh herb flavor. Melting cultured butter into the sauce at the end ensures a velvety texture, and also gives the gravy a subtle tang. It's perfect with Thanksgiving turkey and delicious with roast chicken; substitute well-reduced homemade chicken stock for the turkey jus. Learn more about how to upgrade your gravy for Thanksgiving.
Air Fryer Coconut Shrimp
Rating: Unrated
1
Coconut shrimp are well suited to all sorts of dipping sauces, but we keep it simple here and use Thai sweet chili sauce spruced up with a little chopped fresh cilantro. Using an air fryer instead of frying in oil on the stovetop means crispy shrimp without any splatters to clean up afterwards. Serve the shrimp as an appetizer, or turn them into dinner along with rice and baby bok choy sautéed in toasted sesame oil and fresh ginger.
In this nearly hands-free version adapted from Khoa Tran's family recipe, sweetened condensed milk tames yogurt's assertive tang, producing a silky-smooth yogurt using a convenient multicooker. Instead of being overly sweet, this yogurt is perfectly balanced and can be used in sweet or savory recipes. Tran's recipe cleverly calls for using the leftover condensed milk can for measuring; this version has been standardized for a larger yield.
Multiple factors take this umami-rich gravy to the next level, from the caramelized mushrooms to the herb "whisk" used to impart a fresh herb flavor. Melting cultured butter into the sauce at the end ensures a velvety texture, and also gives the gravy a subtle tang. It's perfect with Thanksgiving turkey and delicious with roast chicken; substitute well-reduced homemade chicken stock for the turkey jus. Learn more about how to upgrade your gravy for Thanksgiving.
Candied Sweet Potatoes
Rating: Unrated
New!
Sweet potatoes are baked in a sweet, buttery sauce with hints of maple syrup and warm autumn spices in this satisfying side. The syrup thickens and becomes sticky as it rests; sprinkling on grated orange zest at the end balances the sweetness of the dish. These candied sweet potatoes are perfect for Thanksgiving, and also pair well with roast pork loin, ham, or chicken. For a more uniform dish, try finding sweet potatoes that are similarly shaped and sized.
Potatoes au Gratin
Rating: Unrated
New!
In this rich, beautiful gratin, potatoes and onions are arranged in concentric circles, coated in a creamy cheese sauce, and topped off with a few more handfuls of shredded cheese. Cheddar and Gruyère work wonderfully here, but feel free to substitute with another one of your favorite melting cheeses, such as Fontina or Havarti. A quick run under the broiler at the end browns the top of the gratin for a little extra flavor and texture.
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Gochujang Sauce
Rating: Unrated
New!
Gochujang, the gently spiced and deeply savory Korean chile paste, is already delicious on its own, but it's also wonderful when simmered with garlic, ginger, and sesame oil to make a saucy condiment you'll want to drizzle over everything. Enjoy it over bibimbap, use it as a marinade for steak, or use it to top grain bowls or even congee.
Garlic-Butter Steak Bites
Rating: Unrated
6
These quickly stir-fried beef bites deliver all the savory luxury of a steakhouse-caliber steak, without the stress over cooking one at home. The buttery, velvety sauce coats every piece nicely, and the vermouth's herbal richness pairs nicely with the savory Worcestershire. Serve as an appetizer with toothpicks, or enjoy over mashed potatoes or polenta.
Salmon Niçoise Salad
Rating: Unrated
1
Tender salmon, briny olives, crisp-tender green beans, and satisfying potatoes all soak up the zippy, perfectly balanced dressing in this variation on a classic tuna Niçoise. Don’t skip the anchovy garnish—it provides pops of umami saltiness that take this salad over the top. Niçoise olives can sometimes be hard to find, but if you can’t find them in jars, be sure to check your market’s olive bar or substitute with kalamatas if you have to.
Our testers called in loads of different plant-based meat products and cooked their way through all of them. Read on for our favorites.
Just when you thought the world didn’t need another chicken stew, this recipe came along to prove otherwise. Just thick enough and full of tender chicken and barely sweet parsnips, it’s remarkably hearty and yet light at the same time. We added a bouqet garni to infuse the stew with extra flavor; save time by substituting a few thyme sprigs and 1 bay leaf instead. The real hero of this dish is the pancetta gremolata; sprinkled over just before serving, it provides a finishing crispy and bright touch that makes this recipe a keeper.
Saag Paneer
Rating: Unrated
3
“Saag” simply means greens, so feel free to sub in any green leafy vegetable you have on hand, from Swiss chard to collards. The aromatic combination of onion, garlic, ginger, and chiles, along with fragrant garam masala, hearty paneer, and a final drizzle of cream make this Indian classic unforgettable.
Pasta tossed with plenty of chopped clams, garlic, and tomato sauce is an iconic Italian-American dish. Here, a few simple touches enhance that homestyle taste: A dose of anchovies boost the savory taste of the clams, herby vermouth stands in for dry white wine (although you could use either), and a touch of butter tossed in at the end unites the pasta and sauce in a truly magical way.Plus: More Pasta Recipes and Tips
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