Marcella Hazan

"This is the simplest of all sauces to make, and none has a purer, more irresistibly sweet tomato taste," says cookbook author Marcella Hazan in her Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking. "I have known people to skip the pasta and eat the sauce directly out of the pot with a spoon." 
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Roast Chicken with Lemons
Rating: Unrated
2
If this were a still life its title could be “Chicken with Two Lemons.” That is all that there is in it. No fat to cook with, no basting to do, no stuffing to prepare, no condiments except for salt and pepper. After you put the chicken in the oven you turn it just once. The bird, with its two lemons, and the oven do all the rest. Again and again, through the years, I meet people who come up to me to say, “I have made your chicken with two lemons and it is the most amazingly simple recipe, the juiciest, best-tasting chicken I have ever had.” And you know, it is perfectly true.Reprinted with permission from Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking by Marcella Hazan. Copyright 1992 by Marcella Hazan. Published by Knopf.
Bolognese Meat Sauce
Rating: Unrated
9
Ragù, as the Bolognese call their celebrated meat sauce, is characterized by mellow, gentle, comfortable flavor that any cook can achieve by being careful about a few basic points: The meat should not be from too lean a cut; the more marbled it is, the sweeter the ragù will be. The most desirable cut of beef is the neck portion of the chuck. Add salt immediately when sauteing the meat to extract its juices for the subsequent benefit of the sauce. Cook the meat in milk before adding wine and tomatoes to protect it from the acidic bite of the latter. Do not use a demiglace or other concentrates that tip the balance of flavors toward harshness. Use a pot that retains heat. Earthenware is preferred in Bologna and by most cooks in Emilia-Romagna, but enameled cast-iron pans or a pot whose heavy bottom is composed of layers of steel alloys are fully satisfactory.Reprinted with permission from Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking by Marcella Hazan. Copyright 1992 by Marcella Hazan. Published by Knopf.
Marcella Hazan discovered salmoriglio 30 years ago. Here, she tells the story of its evolution in her kitchen.
Lightly salting the tomato wedges and letting them stand briefly concentrates their flavor significantly. Be sure to use a sweet onion to maintain the flavor balance in this refreshing salad.
Swordfish Sicilian-Style
Rating: Unrated
1
In 2018, Food & Wine named this recipe one of our 40 best: The late, legendary cookbook author Marcella Hazan joined Food & Wine as a contributing editor in 1992. Former Executive Food Editor Tina Ujlaki remembers that although technique mattered to Hazan, "taste trumped all." Of all the wonderful recipes she created, our all-time favorite is this quick-cooking swordfish, where an oregano-infused sauce imparts bright flavor to hot-off-the-grill steaks. The secret is pricking holes in the fish so the lemony dressing seeps in.
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Stuffed Zucchini Pesaro-Style
Rating: Unrated
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From her earliest days as a cook, Marcella Hazan has enjoyed exploring the potential of hollowed zucchini and has found it can contain a diverse number of good things: ground pork and such pork products as prosciutto and pancetta, ground lamb and rice, or rice with wholly vegetarian accompaniments such as onions, tomatoes and herbs. This is a dish she had in the Marches seaside town of Pesaro. The zucchini contain veal—the meat with the most delicate taste—which stays unusually juicy within its moist vegetable cocoon.Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips
If the shrimp release a lot of liquid during cooking, transfer them to a warmed plate with a slotted spoon and boil the sauce until thickened.Plus: More Seafood Recipes and Tips
Swordfish Sicilian-Style
Rating: Unrated
1
In 2018, Food & Wine named this recipe one of our 40 best: The late, legendary cookbook author Marcella Hazan joined Food & Wine as a contributing editor in 1992. Former Executive Food Editor Tina Ujlaki remembers that although technique mattered to Hazan, "taste trumped all." Of all the wonderful recipes she created, our all-time favorite is this quick-cooking swordfish, where an oregano-infused sauce imparts bright flavor to hot-off-the-grill steaks. The secret is pricking holes in the fish so the lemony dressing seeps in.
Stuffed Zucchini Pesaro-Style
Rating: Unrated
New!
From her earliest days as a cook, Marcella Hazan has enjoyed exploring the potential of hollowed zucchini and has found it can contain a diverse number of good things: ground pork and such pork products as prosciutto and pancetta, ground lamb and rice, or rice with wholly vegetarian accompaniments such as onions, tomatoes and herbs. This is a dish she had in the Marches seaside town of Pesaro. The zucchini contain veal—the meat with the most delicate taste—which stays unusually juicy within its moist vegetable cocoon.Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips
If the shrimp release a lot of liquid during cooking, transfer them to a warmed plate with a slotted spoon and boil the sauce until thickened.Plus: More Seafood Recipes and Tips
Italian beefsteak is rarely, if ever, quite as tender as the best American steaks, but what it lacks in mere tenderness it more than makes up for in taste. An Italian cook understands that grilling alone, however skillfully executed and however choice the cut of meat, is not sufficient to produce good flavor. Flavor is coaxed by a confident sprinkling of salt while the meat is cooking—not after it is served—by good olive oil, by pepper and, on occasion, by the judicious use of garlic and herbs. In order to distribute the seasonings more thoroughly, Italians often cut a large grilled steak into several thick slices, thereby producing many more surfaces to coat. A steak served thus is called a tagliata from the Italian tagliare, to cut.Plus: More Beef Recipes and Tips
If bay scallops are unavailable, use sea scallops that have been halved horizontally and then vertically. Amazing Seafood Recipes
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As Marcella Hazan was browsing at the meat counter of her local market in Longboat Key, Florida, she saw pork loin that had been sliced almost as thin as scaloppine. Her father used to cut it that way and cook the slices quickly in a pan in which he had softened some cut-up young spring onions with a few capersHere in the States, Hazan never sees those sweet young onions that come to the market in Italy with their edible green tops on, but she does find scallions, a variety of onion that Italian farmers see to ignore. The flavor of scallions is even richer than that of onions and not at all unsuited for this dish. Fast Pork Recipes
It's the deep, intense flavor of lamb that sets this sauce apart from other classic meat sauces. So does the fact that the meat is not ground, but cut into small pieces and cooked as you would a stew. This recipe calls for lamb shoulder, but you can use another cut as long as it's not too lean.
Vitello tonnato is easily the greatest of all Italian cold dishes. It’s composed of thinly sliced poached veal layered with a luscious sauce made of olive oil–packed canned tuna, mayonnaise, anchovies and capers. Here, Marcella Hazan brilliantly switches it up: she drops the tuna from the sauce and replaces the meat with poached fresh tuna.  Slideshow: Terrific Tuna Recipes 
This tangy, buttery salmoriglio sauce—a Sicilian classic—is spectacularly delicious with many kinds of fish, not just those specified here; it's always best to simply trust your eyes and nose and buy what's freshest at the fish market. The baking and grilling times below are approximate; the variety and thickness of the fillets will determine how long to cook the fish. More Italian Dishes
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Mara Martin is one of the most precious friends Marcella Hazan has gained through cooking. When she and her husband, Maurizio, were teenagers, they borrowed money to buy Da Fiore, an old wine bar in Venice, and proceeded to transform it into one of Italy's most popular seafood restaurants. They had no professional experience but they had taste, cooking's principal root from which all other qualities germinate.Mara's dishes are rigorously based on the superb local seafood and the preparations are by and large those the understated, light-handed Venetian tradition. She doesn't shrink from updating them, however, when she finds a promising new union of ingredients, as in this combination of local scallops and broccoli from the south of Italy.Mara has a generous hand with butter, which may distress those who think olive oil is the only cooking medium for Italian seafood. But it is butter that does what needs to be done here, tenderly reconciling the reticent mildness of the thin scallop slices with the sourish, vegetal quality of the broccoli. It is impossible to imagine a seafood sauce with a blend of flavors more smooth or ravishing. Hazan had the pleasure of watching Mara make this dish with Long Island bay scallops in her Watermill kitchen in the Hamptons when she and Maurizio came to visit her one summer. That's when Hazan discovered that Mara had forgetfully omitted in the recipe she had written out for her: thyme. Ah, those great Italian cooks—never question their taste, just take a second look at their recipes. Fast Weekday Pastas
Grilled Stuffed Veal Chops
Rating: Unrated
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These chops are best grilled over a charcoal fire, but they can also be broiled or satéed in butter and oil. More Veal Recipes
This is the most deliciously fresh sorbet Marcella Hazan knows. What makes it so is the felicity with which the ingredients act upon each other. The Granny Smith apples and the grappa both have bite, but the grappa isn't all bite. It is packed with the aromatic esters of the pomace, the grape skins left over after making wine, from which it is distilled. The honey is all suavity with its characteristically musky aftertaste. The Muscat brings its own soft touch and the scent of peaches and apricots. These qualities don't stand apart, but coalesce to produce this sorbet's unique, zephyr-like refreshment.If you have all the choices in the world, use the low-alcohol Moscato naturale d'Asti, a shyly sweet Muscat from Piedmont. Only slightly less desirable, but far more available, is Asti Spumante, which you must beat lightly with a fork to drive away some of the bubbles. Beautiful Desserts
Fish in Crazy Water
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Who could ever resist trying a recipe with such a great name (which is a translation of the Italian, pesce all'acqua pazza). What is truly crazy is how simple it is to make an intensely flavored, water-based poaching liquid for fish fillets. Marcella Hazan was introduced to the dish by her friend from Amalfi, Pierino Jovine, and her first reaction was, "Who wants to eat fish in water?" As it turns out, water is the magic liquid that reveals and melds all the flavors.  Slideshow: Italian Seafood Recipes