Maneet Chauhan

Upon disembarking from the train and entering the Vasco da Gama train station, the ros omelets prepared near the station entrance are too enticing to pass up. The aroma of the omelet begins to waft through the air from vendor stalls throughout Goa when the sun begins to set and doesn’t stop until well after midnight, after tourists and locals alike have satisfied their cravings. Ros means “gravy” in Hindi and it’s this spicy element that makes this a unique specialty of the region. The coconut gives the gravy a tropical vibe and the tomatoes and chiles add depth and heat. Goa is like the Ibiza of India, and this omelet, with its rich, comforting, fiery gravy, is enjoyed for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Of course, you could also whip it up deep into the night, the time when most Goan partygoers looking for something to fuel their endless dancing sessions seek it out on the lively Goan streets.
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Take just a few extra minutes, and plain scrambled eggs are transformed into this vibrant eggs bhurji (also spelled "bhurjee") breakfast, flavored with onions, chiles, ginger, tomatoes, and spices. A squeeze of lemon juice and a sprinkling of cilantro add a final dose of brightness. It’s delicious enjoyed with roti or paratha, or served with toast.
This sandwich is a vegetarian’s dream. It’s also a nice option for meat lovers looking for a sandwich stuffed with something just as enticing as a burger. Vada pav, one of Mumbai’s most popular street foods, is a potato fritter the size of a baseball stuffed into a flaky white bun, smeared with coconut and spicy green chile chutneys, and then squished until it’s small enough to fit into your mouth. They’re so much fun to eat and are one of my favorite chaat to have on sticky, hot Mumbai afternoons. I loved them when I was a kid because the size of the vada felt insurmountable until I finally sorted out a way to shove it into my mouth, which simply means I squeezed it down enough and opened my mouth wide enough to fit it all inside!
Masala Paneer Kathi Rolls
Rating: Unrated
1
Fresh cabbage salad adds a sharp, acidic crunch to these warmly spiced, vegetable-filled rolls. These rolls can be served filled or on an assembly line for guests to make their own.
This fresh and crunchy chaat stars a trio of spring peas punched up with a tempered mixture of whole cumin seeds mustard seeds, chiles, and ginger. The tart lemon raita brings a welcome cooling element; spoon the extra over rice, naan, or fresh fruit.
Spicy Mango-Mint Chutney
Rating: Unrated
New!
Vibrantly herbaceous and fiery hot with a balancing sweetness from the mango, this versatile condiment adds a welcome punch to both the Masala Paneer Kathi Rolls and the Spring Pea Chaat with Lemon Raita.
Pav Bhaji
Rating: Unrated
4
Pav bhaji is a classic Indian street food of lightly spicy mashed-vegetable-and-tomato sauce seasoned with warming spices, serrano chiles, and ginger. Served with buttery, toasted rolls, it’s hearty enough to stand in for a full meal.
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Strawberry-Rhubarb Chaat
Rating: Unrated
1
Chaat is no single dish or recipe; it encompasses a range of snacks with a riot of textures and flavors. Here, tart rhubarb plays off the sweetness of strawberries; puffed chickpea cereal (boondi) delivers that essential crunch.
Mango-Cashew Kulfi Pops
Rating: Unrated
1
Canned mango pulp works better in these frozen ice pops than fresh mangoes because of its concentrated flavor, which helps cut through the rich cashews and sweetened condensed milk. Use leftover pulp in the Spicy Mango-Mint Chutney.
Pav Bhaji
Rating: Unrated
4
Pav bhaji is a classic Indian street food of lightly spicy mashed-vegetable-and-tomato sauce seasoned with warming spices, serrano chiles, and ginger. Served with buttery, toasted rolls, it’s hearty enough to stand in for a full meal.
Strawberry-Rhubarb Chaat
Rating: Unrated
1
Chaat is no single dish or recipe; it encompasses a range of snacks with a riot of textures and flavors. Here, tart rhubarb plays off the sweetness of strawberries; puffed chickpea cereal (boondi) delivers that essential crunch.
Mango-Cashew Kulfi Pops
Rating: Unrated
1
Canned mango pulp works better in these frozen ice pops than fresh mangoes because of its concentrated flavor, which helps cut through the rich cashews and sweetened condensed milk. Use leftover pulp in the Spicy Mango-Mint Chutney.
Mango Koochumbar
Rating: Unrated
New!
This simple condiment uses highly flavorful ingredients, and a little chilling time, for big flavors. Use an unripe mango here for the best texture.
Corn puffs form the base of this delicious and impressive snack. You can definitely use Fritos, but try seeking out the Kurkure—they’re super crunchy and flavored with a blend of Indian spices.
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Maneet Chauhan, cookbook author, TV personality, and chef-owner of Chauhan Ale & Masala House in Nashville, designed this dish to help get through a long, cold winter. “What I love about this recipe, in terms of the ingredients and method, is that the mint and charred flavors are reminiscent of summertime despite the chill of winter,” she says. All of the components may be prepped ahead of time, leaving only the last-minute broiling and plating of the dish.
Hyderabadi Lamb Biryani
Rating: Unrated
4
This fragrant spiced lamb-and-rice dish from Chopped judge Maneet Chauhan is just one of the many biryanis she features quarterly at her Nashville restaurant, Chauhan Ale and Masala House. The flour-and-water dough that covers the biryani while it cooks is not meant to be eaten. Instead, crack off the dough lid and discard before serving, then scoop out the saffron-laced rice and lamb beneath. Slideshow:  More Indian Recipes