Kitchen Toke

Easily infuse the benefits of cannabis into foods by making a homemade tincture. When stored in the fridge, the tincture will keep almost indefinitely, ready to be stirred into your favorite food before serving. It’s especially soothing in a warm mug of tea scented with rose, jasmine, and lavender. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.
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These chewy, malty chocolate cookies are ideal for chocolate-covered pretzel fans. Since the recipe calls for olive oil instead of butter, the dough will be quite soft when it's first mixed, but will firm up to the perfect scoopable consistency after a couple of hours in the fridge. If you'd like to skip the Cannabis-Infused Olive Oil, just swap in an additional amount of regular olive oil. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.
A touch of semolina flour gives this citrus- and cannabis-infused dessert a texture similar to a cornmeal cake, while a vibrant citrus glaze and fresh fruit add layers of tart sweetness. Enjoy for dessert, alone or with a dollop of crème fraiche or mascarpone. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.
Before cannabis can be used in a recipe, it must be activated or decarboxylated to maximize all of its benefits. Traditionally, decarbing meant heating the buds in a low oven for two to three hours, a process that can destroy flavor. Decarbing using sous vide, on the other hand, preserves the floral and fragrant flavors known as terpenes. After decarbing, you'll gently infuse the cannabis in olive oil, creating an aromatic ingredient you'll be able to use in both sweet and savory recipes, from aglio e olio pasta to chocolate pretzel cookies and a citrus-infused cake. You'll need an immersion stick circulator, cannabis grinder, vacuum-sealable bag, and avacuum sealer for this recipe. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.
Editor's Note: This recipe has been modified from the version developed by Anya Von Bremzen to include cannabis-infused butter in addition to regular butter. You'll find the original non-cannabis recipe here. These incredible brownies are filled with a layer of gooey salted caramel which can be made two weeks in advance. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.
Steak isn't the only edible that benefits from the low and slow approach.
Premium Cannabutter
Rating: Unrated
6
Making cannabutter is a time-honored way of infusing cannabis into food, since so many recipes include butter as an ingredient. But not all cannabutters are created equal. Before cannabis can be used in a recipe, it must be "activated" or, in a technical sense, decarboxylated, to maximize its benefits. Traditionally, decarbing meant heating the buds at a low temperature for two to three hours in the oven. But this method can destroy flavor and lead to bitterness. But thankfully, there's a better (and more delicious) way. Decarbing using the sous-vide technique eliminates the uneven and often harsh heat of the old-school method and preserves the fragrant, floral compounds in cannabis known as terpenes. Here's how to make this cannabutter step by step. Recipes for Cannabis-Infused Jam-Stuffed Brioche French Toast, Buttered Pasta with Clams and Green Chiles, or Citrus-Caramel Blondies are great places to start cooking with it. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.
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Premium Cannabutter
Rating: Unrated
6
Making cannabutter is a time-honored way of infusing cannabis into food, since so many recipes include butter as an ingredient. But not all cannabutters are created equal. Before cannabis can be used in a recipe, it must be "activated" or, in a technical sense, decarboxylated, to maximize its benefits. Traditionally, decarbing meant heating the buds at a low temperature for two to three hours in the oven. But this method can destroy flavor and lead to bitterness. But thankfully, there's a better (and more delicious) way. Decarbing using the sous-vide technique eliminates the uneven and often harsh heat of the old-school method and preserves the fragrant, floral compounds in cannabis known as terpenes. Here's how to make this cannabutter step by step. Recipes for Cannabis-Infused Jam-Stuffed Brioche French Toast, Buttered Pasta with Clams and Green Chiles, or Citrus-Caramel Blondies are great places to start cooking with it. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.