Khushbu Shah

Khushbu Shah

Khushbu Shah is the Restaurant Editor at Food & Wine.

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For Lisa Ludwinski and her beloved Detroit bakery Sister Pie, Thanksgiving is the biggest day of the year.
From a TikTok-inspired wrap to butter terrine, these dishes stood out this year to F&W Restaurant Editor Khushbu Shah.
The 33rd class of Best New Chefs will guide the industry toward a stronger, brighter, more equitable future for workers and diners alike.
Inspired by Michigan ingredients and memories of her mother’s cooking, this Best New Chef offers lessons in the history of Korean cuisine interspersed among layers of flavor and texture.
Family is central to this Filipino chef’s food and philosophy. His cooking is an homage to the vibrant flavors of his childhood, a tribute to his late father, and a promise to a community whose ambitions he wants to support.
 A lifelong student of Korean food, this Best New Chef wants to educate and inform diners about the cuisine, with a boundary-pushing menu that looks both to the past and to the future for inspiration.
This Best New Chef draws inspiration from the international grocery stores of Los Angeles and channels them into her innovative, decadent pastries—from a custardy ube pie to fluffy, tender conchas.
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Kindness in the kitchen is as important as creativity to this chef, who draws on the flavors of her honolulu childhood to create a menu that’s part Hawaiian, part Californian, and entirely her own.
In a former pizza joint in the Bywater neighborhood, the chefs and co-owners of Saint-Germain are serving the most creative, ambitious, and accessible tasting menu in the nation.
Through a delicious deep dive into research and development and a visionary new business model, this Best New Chef wants to change the way you think about American Chinese food.
At his groundbreaking restaurant, this chef is advancing a new definition of Tex-Mex cooking through fresh masa, “black magic oil,” and the gospel of great tortillas.
This joyful pastry chef’s bold and vibrant desserts are matched by her energy, humor, and enthusiasm to improve kitchen culture and help make the hospitality industry a more fair and equitable place.
This self-taught pitmaster, who has never worked in any restaurant but his own, didn’t start cooking until his twenties. Today, he’s making up for lost time with a single-minded dedication and a unique, personal, and delicious style of barbecue.
The contrarian chef has found success in refusing to run a traditional restaurant.
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At her creamery, Miyoko Schinner is transforming the world of vegan dairy.
Blue moon is a sweet staple of Midwestern summers.
Found throughout Asia, these chilly treats offer beguiling textures and cooling sweetness perfect for the height of summer.
Royal Falooda
Rating: Unrated
New!
There is no incorrect way to layer falooda, the milky, traditionally rose-flavored dessert beloved in India, Pakistan, and other parts of South Asia. Everyone has their own preference on how to stack the components—but agree that falooda is always best built in a tall glass. This dessert stars bouncy cubes of rose jelly suspended in rose syrup–sweetened milk over layers of tender corn vermicelli and chewy chia seeds. A crowning scoop of vanilla ice cream adds a creamy finish. With its beguiling mix of textures, the Royal Falooda belongs to a category of colorful, cooling desserts that appear throughout Asia which are hard to label but extremely easy to eat.
Preparing for a trip to Japan, one soda at a time.
Zeeshan Shah and Yoshi Yamada’s spicy Indian-Italian mash-up is love at first bite.
At Night + Market, Kris and Sarah Yenbamroong show you a whole new way to pair wine and Thai food.
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Carlos Gaytán adds layers of flavor to French onion soup.
Five grains we love that will add more carbs to your cooking repertoire.
While plant-based meat alternatives are taking over American menus, it's almost impossible to find veggie burgers made from actual veggies.