Kat Kinsman

Kat Kinsman is senior editor at Food & Wine, author of Hi, Anxiety: Life With a Bad Case of Nerves, host of Food & Wine's Communal Table podcast, and founder of Chefs With Issues. Previously, she was the senior food & drinks editor at Extra Crispy, editor-in-chief and editor at large at Tasting Table, and the founding editor of CNN Eatocracy. She is a frequent public speaker on the topics of food and mental health, won a 2020 IACP Award for Personal Essay / Memoir and has had work included in the 2020 and 2016 editions of The Best American Food Writing.

The Food & Wine team finds joy where we can in a dark month.
Advertisement
Restaurateur Carl Sobocinski saw COVID-19 case rates spiking in his community, so he took action—and took care of his people.
The Greenville restaurateur talks about investing in people and closing his restaurants to stop the spread of COVID-19.
As Kiki Aranita explains, "Hawaii's food is constantly evolving, it's constantly changing, and I feel like it's this big, warm hug that keeps bringing in new flavors and influences."
The Poi Dog chef talks about closing her restaurant, collective trauma, and selling sauce.
The F&W team keeps the flame alive.
I didn't know true happiness until I started growing fruit in my very dark apartment.
The chef and cookbook author talks about why therapy is a lifesaver and how to snap back to feeling like a chef.
Advertisement
Sazon's greetings from Isaac Toups, Preeti Mistry, Hawa Hassan, and Eric Rivera.
The Memorial novelist talks about showing up, growing up, and morning-after omelets.
The holiday cookie does not have to crumble on your watch.
It's great to have fruits, vegetables, and herbs at the ready but there's another reason you should grow plants inside this winter.
The Food & Wine kitchen team talks you through the recipes they're making for the holidays, and how to cope with a very different Thanksgiving table this year.
Food snobbery has no place at the table, especially at the holidays.
Advertisement
A few years back when my husband called his 90-something-year-old mother to get the recipe for this holiday favorite, she laughed and said no one ever had bothered to write it down. “You just make it!” she told him, but did eventually walk him through the method. The exact makeup of this Eastern Carolina dish varies from family to family, but in the Wagner kitchen, gooey cheese and a crisp potato chip topping is key, and if you’re worried that you’re cooking down the vegetables too much—you’re not. Gloriously caramelized mush is the goal and when done just right, this casserole can be filed under “looks like hell, tastes like heaven.” READ: Never Be Ashamed of Your Family's Casserole
You're not going to mess this up, I promise.
The restaurateur, author, and TV star talks about Southernness, pride, pivots, and politics.
The Final Table star talks about kitchen intensity, belonging, and cooking for your mom.
Does the devil take AmEx or just Bitcoin?
The Cool Beans author and WaPo food editor talks about representation, minimizing meat, and the effect that writing a bean-based cookbook has on a marriage.
Now that I'm spending a lot more quality time with my dishes, these sponges, Swedish dishcloths, brushes, scrapers, and detergent help me be considerably less gross. I hope.
Advertisement
You see a lawn, I see a salad bar.
The veteran bartenders talk about what it takes to stick around for the long haul.
Chill out with these trays, picks, tongs, crushers, and the mother of all ice makers.