Justin Chapple
Justin Chapple

Justin Chapple

Location: New York, NY

Expertise: Recipe Development, Cookbook Writing

Justin Chapple is a chef, recipe developer, food writer, video host, and cookbook author. He's the culinary director-at-large of Food & Wine, and host of its video series "Mad Genius Tips", for which he was twice James Beard Award- nominated.

Experience: Originally from California, Justin Chapple studied classic culinary arts at the French Culinary Institute in New York City. After working as a line cook, Justin helped to produce the Food & Wine Classic in Aspen before joining the magazine's recipe test kitchen. He then moved into the role of culinary director-at-large and continues to host "Mad Genius Tips". Justin's first cookbook, "Mad Genius Tips", is filled with expert hacks and delicious recipes from the video series. His second book, "Just Cook It!", features built-to-be-easy recipes inspired by his California upbringing and his work as a professional recipe developer.
Scallop Grenobloise
Rating: Unrated
New!
Grenobloise means in the style of the southeastern French city of Grenoble, and refers to a classic French sauce of lemon and capers. Here, beautifully seared scallops with a golden crust are served in a sauce popping with acidity from lemon, brininess from capers, and slight warmth from mildly piquant jalapeños. Toss them with a favorite pasta for a quick, simple meal. For the best results, seek out Massachusetts dayboat scallops. They are harvested daily and are dry-packed, which yields the best flavor and sear.
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Thai-Style Bluefish Salad
Rating: Unrated
New!
Laap pla duk, a Thai catfish salad, is the inspiration for this flavor-packed dish of flaked bluefish fillets tossed with fish sauce, lime juice, spicy red Thai chiles, and fresh mint and cilantro. Toasted and powdered jasmine rice adds aroma and helps unify the dish, absorbing flavors from the other ingredients. Serve the salad with lettuce leaves, lime wedges, and cooked rice so each diner can assemble their own lettuce wraps. Rich, oily bluefish are abundant in the waters off Cape Cod. If you can't find bluefish, another fatty fish like mackerel is a good substitute.
Fresh fillets of haddock are coated with smoky paprika, garlic powder, oregano, and thyme before they get a quick sear to develop a delicious crust. They are then sandwiched between toasted brioche buns smeared with a strong, tangy tartar sauce laced with refreshingly piquant horseradish. If your fish fillets are thicker than 3/4 inch, butterfly them by carefully cutting through the center of the fillet (parallel to the work surface), leaving 1/2 inch of the meat attached at the side so it can be opened like a book.
This Cataplana from F&W's Culinary Director-at-Large Justin Chapple is his riff on a savory feast of shellfish and smoky linguiça hailing from the Algarve in Portugal. Named for the vessel it is traditionally cooked and served in, the stew gets lots of flavor from the Portuguese linguiça included, but you can substitute Spanish-style chorizo or even kielbasa in a pinch.
The traditional toad in the hole consists of whole sausages cooked in an egg-and-flour batter. This recipe delivers a taste of the British classic but stars tender baby carrots and spring onions for a flavorful, vegetable-forward spring twist. 
Rhubarb Coffee Cake
Rating: Unrated
1
This streusel-topped rhubarb coffee cake is a standout celebration of spring. With a tender, springy crumb, the cake is the perfect match for the rosy, tart rhubarb on top. The addition of buttermilk lends tanginess and richness to the cake batter, while the rhubarb is marinated in sugar before baking, softening the fibrous stalks to result in a deliciously jammy texture.
Spring onions are the sweetest alliums of the year, and they play well in this salad with first of-the-season asparagus and tender lettuces. Soy and ginger team up with sherry vinegar in the tangy dressing that's perfect with the rich, jammy egg yolks. If spring onions aren't available, you can substitute scallions. 
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These radish and turnip-topped tartines are a great way to use up radishes and turnips with their greens attached. The radish and turnip greens whipped with sweet butter, garlic, and lemon zest create a delicious, silky spread for the tartines, while the spicy, paper-thin radishes and turnips make the perfect topping. Finished with crunchy sea salt, these make a great appetizer or light lunch. 
Unlike their larger, late-season siblings, baby veggies are supremely quick to cook. Creamy new potatoes add substance to this quick one-pan skillet dinner of tender shrimp, fresh shelling peas, and dill, which come together in a sweet and buttery broth laced with cream. 
Spring onions are the sweetest alliums of the year, and they play well in this salad with first of-the-season asparagus and tender lettuces. Soy and ginger team up with sherry vinegar in the tangy dressing that's perfect with the rich, jammy egg yolks. If spring onions aren't available, you can substitute scallions. 
These radish and turnip-topped tartines are a great way to use up radishes and turnips with their greens attached. The radish and turnip greens whipped with sweet butter, garlic, and lemon zest create a delicious, silky spread for the tartines, while the spicy, paper-thin radishes and turnips make the perfect topping. Finished with crunchy sea salt, these make a great appetizer or light lunch. 
Unlike their larger, late-season siblings, baby veggies are supremely quick to cook. Creamy new potatoes add substance to this quick one-pan skillet dinner of tender shrimp, fresh shelling peas, and dill, which come together in a sweet and buttery broth laced with cream. 
A mix of citrus, buttery olives, and spicy, oil-packed chiles punches up the flavor of braised chicken leg quarters. Toasted fennel seeds and dry sherry add a pleasant warmth to the sauce, which begs to be served with a baguette for sopping. 
Vegan Sloppy Joes
Rating: Unrated
1
With jalapeño for heat and brown sugar for sweetness, these vegan sloppy joes will please meat eaters and vegetarians alike. Made from fermented soybeans, tempeh gives these meatless sloppy joes a heartier texture than firm tofu alone. 
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Smoky roasted cauliflower and nutty brown butter headline this satisfying vegetarian main course. Like tiny gnocchi, German spaetzle are delicious simply blanched but spring to a whole new level when crisped with butter in a pan. This recipe calls for store-bought dried spaetzle, which turn springy and chewy when cooked. Boiled then crisped in butter, they get a finishing lift from fresh dill and crushed red pepper.
Short Rib Chili
Rating: Unrated
6
Fresh jalapeños, smoky chipotles in adobo, and fruity ancho chile powder give this thick, meaty short rib chili layers of heat, while red wine and tomato add acidity to balance out the richness of the tender short ribs. For a more budget-friendly option, substitute cubed beef chuck roast for the short ribs. Homemade pickled red onions provide a colorful, tasty, crunchy topping.
Italian Wedding Risotto
Rating: Unrated
4
Inspired by the classic Italian wedding soup, this heartier risotto is filled with just-wilted spinach and topped with crispy, garlicky meatballs. Use a cookie scoop to quickly portion out the meatballs; make a double batch and freeze half to whip up this risotto in a flash. Remove the risotto from the heat while it's still a little soupy—it will thicken slightly as it rests. 
Starring hearty wild rice and toasty ciabatta croutons, this satisfying side dish comes together entirely on the stovetop, freeing up oven space. Bread and wild rice carry this dressing-meets-salad mash-up, but it's the flavorful additions that steal the show, namely salty pancetta, crunchy pine nuts, buttery olives, and plenty of fresh parsley.
Macaroni and cheese is always a crowd-pleaser. This version features a combination of fontina for optimal gooey texture and cheddar for its tangy flavor, and a crispy mix of toasted panko, parsley, lemon, and garlic that cuts through the richness of the ultra-creamy baked shells.
A riff on creamed spinach, this cheesy gratin is studded with buttery toasted gnocchi. Swiss chard adds an earthy bite, while a duo of nutty Gruyère and salty Parmigiano-Reggiano brings richness and depth to the béchamel. Store-bought gnocchi help this gratin come together in a flash; toasting it in butter instead of boiling adds a compelling crunch.
Smoky and spicy, cured Spanish chorizo infuses melted butter with its rich color and flavor, balancing the natural sweetness of these tender roasted sweet potatoes. Scoring baked sweet potatoes and then broiling them gives them a hint of smoke and lets the chorizo butter soak into every bite.
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These mashed potatoes are a speedy, nearly effortless dish thanks to a flavor-packed special ingredient: a garlic-and-herb-flecked spreadable cheese (such as Boursin). For a colorful twist, use purple Peruvian potatoes instead of Yukon Golds to make purple mashed potatoes.
Covering the mushrooms for the first few minutes of cooking helps them release their liquid and brown more quickly. Once uncovered, the liquid evaporates, and the mushrooms begin to brown. The result (which is extra umami-rich thanks to the addition of coconut aminos) is a succulent, versatile batch of mushrooms that can be served as a side dish; they could also be spooned over steak, or stirred into hot pasta for an easy dinner.
Mushroom Conserva
Rating: Unrated
New!
Marinated in a blend of Champagne vinegar, olive oil, toasted fennel seeds, garlic, and thyme, these tender mushrooms are a winning appetizer waiting to happen. Spoon them over ricotta-topped toast or gooey baked Brie, or add them to a cheese board with plenty of crusty bread for sopping.
Named for the 17th-century French marquis d'Uxelles, duxelles is a mixture of minced mushrooms cooked down with shallots and deglazed with wine. In addition to serving as a flavorful filling for the Mushroom Dumplings in Toasted Ginger and Garlic Broth, it's delicious folded into omelets or spread on toast.
Make-ahead mushroom duxelles makes a rich filling for these tender, satisfying dumplings. The broth, infused with toasted ginger and garlic, gets an extra layer of rich mushroom flavor from dried white flower shiitake mushrooms, which have a bolder flavor than regular dried shiitakes, which are a fine substitute.
Feathery and dramatic, hen-of-the-woods mushrooms (also known as maitake) become delightfully crispy when fried. You know they are nearly ready when the sizzling oil starts to subside. Here, prepared marinara and freshly-grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese give these crispy mushrooms Italian-American flair.
Thick-stemmed king trumpet mushrooms grill up meaty and tender, while feathery oyster mushrooms get nice and crispy—both are great options for these quick-cooking kebabs. Piled into warm pitas with a smear of tangy labneh and a drizzle of intensely herby salsa verde, this dish is a fun, fresh way to enjoy mushrooms.