José Andrés
José Andrés

José Andrés

F&W Star Chef » See All F&W Chef Superstars Superstar Spanish chef José Andrés tells Food & Wine about his passion for paella, cooking à la plancha and why chopsticks are the perfect kitchen tool. What’s your most requested recipe, the one dish you’re most known for? More and more, my paella. I’ve also been making a big push for it over the past year—I truly believe everyone in America will know how to make paella within the next 50 years, and will cook paella like they now do barbecue on the 4th of July. It has all the right components: You cook it outside like you do for barbecue, but at the next level of sophistication. It gives you many options, and you can feed a lot of people once you get the hang of it. So I predict paella will be the next big thing. What’s your favorite cookbook of all time? I keep changing. I think my favorite book right now would be The Virginia Housewife, by Mary Randolph. If Americans want to know what America is, they need to know that book. It wasn’t the first cookbook printed in America, but you could argue it was the first cookbook printed in America written by an American. The cookbooks that preceded it were all copies of English books. It was an important book for me when I opened my pop-up, America Eats Tavern, in Washington, DC, last year; we offered a Mary Randolph tasting menu with her mock turtle soup. She even had 10 Spanish recipes in there. What’s the best cheap cooking gadget? The cheapest gadget—and you don’t even have to spend a dime—is chopsticks from a Chinese restaurant. I use them for everything: to toss salads, to turn a piece of meat in the pan, to flip croquettes in the Fryolator, to whisk eggs for omelets, to stir eggs into fried rice when I make that for my daughters. I also like to use chopsticks as tweezers; they can bring a level of sophistication when you cook. Sometimes I like to plate salads using chopsticks; it’s a great chance to concentrate and relax. What’s one technique everyone should know? How to cook à la plancha. A plancha is just a hot flat surface. So if you think about it, anything is a plancha, like a sauté pan or a griddle. À la plancha is the perfect way to cook for a crowd. Most people only use their griddles for pancakes, but you can sear vegetables like sliced zucchini or mushrooms, thinly sliced meats like chicken or pork, or thinly sliced fish or squid. You can do grilled cheese sandwiches à la plancha, a quick omelet à la plancha, you can even open oysters or clams à la plancha with hardly any need for oil. Nothing could be easier. Say you have beautiful, fresh, head-on Louisiana shrimp: You can sprinkle the hot plancha with a little salt, put the shrimp on the plancha and season the shrimp, then wait 4 to 5 minutes before flipping them to cook the other side. Wait another few minutes until the shrimp are white all the way through, and you have Louisiana shrimp à la plancha. Serve the shrimp or vegetables or omelet with a little pesto or mayonnaise, some other favorite sauce, mayo, you don’t need much. A plancha is all you need! Can you share a great entertaining tip? Don’t try to do more than one hot dish. To serve something hot à la minute, you have to be in the kitchen controlling the oven or the fire. Especially when you have more than eight or 10 people, things begin to get complicated. And when things get complicated, you’re not having fun, and the kitchen is a mess. Serve only one hot thing that can hold, like a soup—clam chowder, lobster chowder, pumpkin soup, people enjoy those a lot and they’re all very easy. If you want to keep your side dishes warmer than room temperature, consider buying a small steam table for the home, with the Sterno cans underneath. Last, don’t make excuses if something doesn’t turn out quite as you planned; you’ve tried your best.
Rabo de Toro
Rating: Unrated
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This lusty braised-oxtails dish is common in Córdoba. The meaty oxtails are simmered in a mix of tomatoes, red wine, sherry and more, until they’re wonderfully tender and flavorful.
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Steak with Arabic Sauces
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At Restaurante El Churrasco in Córdoba, they serve both salsa verde and salsa roja in small containers alongside juicy grilled steak. The salsa verde is bright and tangy, while the salsa roja is smoky and garlicky. They’re both delicious. Slideshow: More T-Bone Steak Recipes 
Fried Fish in Adobo
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Swordfish marinated in a combination of olive oil, vinegar, garlic and paprika takes on superb tangy flavor. Chef José Andrés coats the fish in flour, then fries it until crisp, creating an irresistible little tapas snack.  Slideshow: More Swordfish Recipes 
This simple salad is inspired by the tapas bars and asadores (grill-focused restaurants) in and around Córdoba. It highlights sweet and tender Little Gem lettuce, adorned with warm, garlicky olive oil, sherry vinegar, anchovies and a sprinkle of smoky paprika. Slideshow: More Salad Recipes 
Salmorejo
Rating: Unrated
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Salmorejo is a classic soup made primarily with tomatoes and bread. It’s best with a splash of sherry vinegar, but Andalusian tomatoes pack a good hit of acidity, so they often omit it in Spain. It’s also frequently made with pan de telera, a type of hard roll, which thickens the soup, but anything from a ciabatta to a rustic white loaf is good here. Slideshow: More Cold Soup Recipes 
These incredible eggs are slowly fried in olive oil until they’re soft and creamy, then served draped over crisp, salty french fries. As if that’s not enough, they’re topped with briny caviar and slices of excellent jamón ibérico.  Slideshow: More Fried Egg Recipes 
This potato salad gets its creamy texture from olive oil and eggs, and tons of flavor from the inclusion of tuna and salty trout roe. Slideshow: More Potato Salad Recipes 
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Despite its 3,000-year history of catching wild bluefin tuna, Spain’s tuna culture has largely been limited to canned and salted tuna products. This luscious dish, a staple of southern Spain, is one of the exceptions. Slideshow: More Tuna Recipes 
This dish is inspired by the rotisserie chicken and sauce from El Asador de Nati in Córdoba. The base for the rich, extremely flavorful pan sauce comes from the chicken pan drippings and a whole head of luscious roasted garlic. Slideshow: More Chicken Recipes 
This potato salad gets its creamy texture from olive oil and eggs, and tons of flavor from the inclusion of tuna and salty trout roe. Slideshow: More Potato Salad Recipes 
Despite its 3,000-year history of catching wild bluefin tuna, Spain’s tuna culture has largely been limited to canned and salted tuna products. This luscious dish, a staple of southern Spain, is one of the exceptions. Slideshow: More Tuna Recipes 
This dish is inspired by the rotisserie chicken and sauce from El Asador de Nati in Córdoba. The base for the rich, extremely flavorful pan sauce comes from the chicken pan drippings and a whole head of luscious roasted garlic. Slideshow: More Chicken Recipes 
Fried eggplant and honey is a classic combination served across Andalusia, especially in Córdoba. This version is the one José Andrés has on the menu at his Washington, DC, restaurant Jaleo. Slideshow: More Eggplant Recipes 
Salt-Baked Fish
Rating: Unrated
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Chef José Andrés bakes whole fish in a salt crust until it's perfectly moist and seasoned. His trick is to leave the scales on the fish, which makes the skin very easy to peel off after baking. 
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Mushroom Tortilla
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This Spanish mushroom omelet from chef José Andrés is supersimple and a great make-ahead dish for brunch. Slideshow: More Recipes With Mushrooms 
Star chef José Andrés dresses this amazing vegetable bowl with a delicious roasted-garlic yogurt sauce as well as a bright honey-lemon dressing. Slideshow: More Quinoa Recipes 
Ham-and-Potato Salad
Rating: Unrated
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In his elevated version of potato salad, star chef José Andrés combines fingerling potatoes, smoky ham and cucumbers in a whipped deviled egg dressing. Slideshow:  More Potato Salad Recipes 
Tres Leches Cake
Rating: Unrated
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Star chef José Andrés makes a delicately light and sweet version of tres leches, the classic chilled cake soaked in three kinds of milk: evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk and heavy cream. Plus:  F&W's Guide to Dessert Recipes 
Allioli is an incredibly popular and versatile sauce that is eaten across Spain with fish, meat and vegetables. This recipe is the real thing—allioli the old-fashioned way, made with a mortar and pestle. It's perfect with the grilled meats and sausages that are at the heart of Catalan cooking. But it's not just the taste that makes this sauce so incredible; it's the process. It's hard to believe that olive oil and garlic can come together to create something so rich and buttery. It may take a lot of work, but a little goes a long way.Plus: More Grilling Recipes and Tips
There's no better tapa than a good stuffed olive. But the stuffed olives you buy in the supermarket are normally filled with ingredients of poor quality. The way to make the best appetizer is to take a good olive and stuff it with the real thing. Fast Hors d'Oeuvres
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Star chef and molecular gastronomist Jose Andres creates a liquid sphere for one of his signature dishes. In this recipe he uses watermelon juice.
This recipe makes more filling than is needed for the empanadas. Use the leftover to top crostini or toss with pasta.Plus: More Appetizer Recipes and Tips