Jim Meehan

Manhattan Cocktail
Rating: Unrated
1
The Manhattan is one of the most popular whiskey cocktails, and has been enjoyed for over a century. The earliest known printed recipe for the Manhattan was published in O. H. Byron's 1884 Modern Bartenders' Guide. The book cites two versions: one made with French vermouth, the other with Italian. The drink is traditionally made with rye whiskey, but some bartenders prefer to use bourbon. You can add a splash of juice from the jar of maraschino cherries if you'd like to add fruity sweetness to the drink, or alternatively, garnish with a lemon peel. More Classic Cocktails
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Vieux Carré
Rating: Unrated
New!
Stanley Clisby Arthur's 1937 Famous New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix 'Em attributes this drink to Walter Bergeron, head bartender at the Hotel Monteleone. More Classic Cocktails
Sidecar
Rating: Unrated
New!
According to Robert Vermeire's 1922 Cocktails: How to Mix Them, the sidecar was invented by the celebrated bartender MacGarry of London's Buck's Club. More Classic Cocktails
Mint Julep
Rating: Unrated
New!
The Mint Julep has been the iconic drink of the Kentucky Derby since 1939, but references to the cocktail go as far back as the year 900, when it was sipped for medicinal purposes. When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian was at Bar UnCommon, he recited an ode while mixing Mint Juleps, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the bourbon and mint cocktail "the very dream of drinks." More Classic Cocktails
Martini
Rating: Unrated
1
The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman's 1904 American BarMore Classic Cocktails
Hemingway Daiquiri
Rating: Unrated
2
In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway "often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles."
Bronx
Rating: Unrated
New!
In his 1934 book What Shall We Drink?, Magnus Bredenbek credits this drink to a Bronx restaurateur named Joseph Sormani. More Classic Cocktails
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Bronx
Rating: Unrated
New!
In his 1934 book What Shall We Drink?, Magnus Bredenbek credits this drink to a Bronx restaurateur named Joseph Sormani. More Classic Cocktails