Jean-Georges Vongerichten
Jean-Georges Vongerichten

Jean-Georges Vongerichten

F&W Star Chef » See All F&W Chef Superstars Superchef Jean-Georges Vongerichten, who celebrates his 40th year of cooking in 2013, reveals his most-requested dish, his go-to 100-year-old cookbook and a brilliant technique for chopping garlic. What’s your most requested recipe? This would definitely have to be the Yellowfin Tuna Ribbons, Avocado and Spicy Radish, Ginger Marinade. It has been on the menu at Jean-Georges for the past six years and each week it’s one of our top sellers. I think it’s the texture and combination of flavors that people really crave. What’s your favorite cookbook of all time?Gastronomie Pratique, by Ali-Bab. A scientist and philosopher, Henri Babinski, wrote it more than 100 years ago, and was way ahead of his time. He gives every technique from making raspberry lemonade to vinaigrettes to soufflés. He even shows you how to make oysters en gelée using natural gelatin—gelatin made from boiled pig’s feet, not gelatin leaves or agar-agar. Everything he did is so technical and precise, it’s amazing. Everyone always cites Escoffier, but Escoffier just codified a cuisine that already existed. This was something new, and much more interesting. It’s hard to find, though; I wish someone would bring it back into print. One technique everyone should know? How to chop a clove of garlic: Slice a peeled garlic clove in half lengthwise. Set the clove halves cut sides down on your chopping board, and turn your knife sharp side up. Using the blunt edge of the knife, “mince” the clove halves as you would mince them with the sharp blade: Using your finger as a guide, working your way from the tip to the root end, use the blunt edge to smash the garlic against the board. Flip the smashed clove halves over, flip your knife over and use the sharp edge to chop the clove halves finely, working in the opposite direction, from the root end to the tip. They’ll come out perfectly chopped, as if you pulverized them in a blender. To chop them that finely using only the sharp blade, you’d have to chop them a long time.
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For his elegant starter, Jean-Georges Vongerichten ingeniously combines raisins, capers and butter as a sauce for sautéed scallops. He seasons the sauce with sherry vinegar, which adds wonderful tartness. Slideshow:  More Recipes from Chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten 
At NYC's Jean Georges, this light and deliciously garlicky soup is served with frog's legs. To make at home, swap scallops—which are similarly sweet, delicate and meaty—for the frog's legs. Slideshow:  More Recipes by Jean-Georges Vongerichten 
In his clever version of stuffed grape leaves, chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten uses tender kale as the wrapper, and stuffs them with a tabbouleh of bulgur, cucumber, mint and sour cherry. Slideshow:  Best Kale Recipes 
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Like a frugal Alsatian housewife, Jean-Georges Vongerichten uses the asparagus peels to make a fragrant broth. When he adds them to boiling water, their characteristically grassy aroma emerges almost immediately.Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips
Watercress Salad
Rating: Unrated
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Although it's designed to accompany Quail with Asian Spices, this is a fine stand-alone salad that is fast and easy to make, at least if you omit the crunchy leeks (which you may not want to do; they're irresistible).Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips
Like a frugal Alsatian housewife, Jean-Georges Vongerichten uses the asparagus peels to make a fragrant broth. When he adds them to boiling water, their characteristically grassy aroma emerges almost immediately.Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips
Watercress Salad
Rating: Unrated
New!
Although it's designed to accompany Quail with Asian Spices, this is a fine stand-alone salad that is fast and easy to make, at least if you omit the crunchy leeks (which you may not want to do; they're irresistible).Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips
"Fermented cabbage is the most common kind, but kimchi is actually a pickling technique, so you can make it with any vegetable," explains Marja Vongerichten. "Every Korean household has a different recipe: Some use pears, others, raw shrimp or oysters." This classic recipe includes napa cabbage, ginger and garlic. More Jean-Georges Vongerichten Recipes
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Do you remember the last time you had a salad dressing that was not made with olive oil? "My family always used sunflower oil—not olive oil," says Jean-Georges Vongerichten, because sunflowers bloomed abundantly where he grew up in Alsace. The neutral oil has a way of making all the other flavors more vibrant. This zingy salad can be served year-round, though in winter you'll want to substitute grape tomatoes for the beefsteak here.Plus: More Vegetable Recipes and Tips
Toasted-Coconut Custard Tart
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Jean-Georges Vongerichten loves this tart from his friend Maya Gurley of Maya's Restaurant in St. Bart's. The soft custard filling and the caramelized shredded coconut topping have the creamy-crunchy texture of a coconut macaroon.More Pies and Tarts
After writer Aleksandra Crapanzano enjoyed this salad in her room at the Mark Hotel in New York, she swore she'd add both the velvety, tangy butter sauce on the shrimp and the earthy, salty-sweet vinaigrette on the salad to her permanent repertoire. More Delicious Shrimp Dishes More Recipes by Jean-Georges Vongerichten
Tangy Tomato and Mango Salad
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In Jean-Georges Vongerichten's version of a dish that his friend Maya Gurley serves at her St. Bart's restaurant, he dresses plump tomatoes and sweet, juicy mango slices with red wine vinegar, just a little olive oil and plenty of sliced fresh basil.More Recipes for Tomatoes
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By roasting jalapeños before incorporating them into this silken puree, Jean-Georges Vongerichten gives the dish a subtle smokiness. Use sweet fresh peas if you can find them; frozen peas also work. More Recipes with Peas
For this light, healthy dish, Jean-Georges Vongerichten steams snapper fillets in foil packets with a piquant mix of ginger, lemongrass, green Thai chiles, miso, fish sauce, tarragon, scallions and orange zest. The blend can be made ahead of time and used to flavor other meats like chicken and pork.
The tamarind sauce adds a touch of flavor to this very healthy dish.
Steamed Buns with Cured Ham
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These fluffy buns need two risings. After the second rise, they must be steamed immediately, then they can be held for an hour or two and resteamed just before serving. Jean-Georges Vongerichten's favorite filling for these buns is a dry-cured Smithfield-type ham, which recalls the Yunnan hams found in China.Plus: More Appetizer Recipes and Tips
Versions of this steamed fish are made all over China, but in Shanghai the recipe always contains a little aged soy sauce. When Jean-Georges Vongerichten adapted the dish for 66 he couldn't find aged soy in New York and substituted caramelized onions for sweetness and depth of flavor. Slideshow: More Amazing Seafood Recipes