Jasmine Smith

Air Fryer Shrimp Scampi
Rating: Unrated
2
This shrimp scampi recipe has it all — it's buttery, garlicky, lemony, and gets a hint of heat from crushed red pepper and bright herbal flavor from basil. The air fryer makes it especially easy. You start the sauce in a pan in the air fryer, then add the shrimp and remaining sauce ingredients. Once the shrimp is cooked, just toss it with cooked linguine and you're ready to go. For a deeper sweet seafood flavor in the sauce, leave the shells on the shrimp. You can also serve the shrimp with crusty bread instead of pasta if you'd prefer.
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Air Fryer Meatballs
Rating: Unrated
New!
These air fryer meatballs get a touch of heat from Calabrian chiles, and herbal flavor from fresh basil and parsley. Soaking the breadcrumbs in milk before mixing them with the meat helps ensure a tender texture. When forming the meatballs, wet your hands first to prevent sticking. After about 10 minutes in the air fryer, they'll emerge deliciously browned and ready to pair with marinara sauce — we call for store-bought here, but feel free to make your own if you'd prefer. Want to make the meatballs ahead of time? They can be cooked earlier in the day, refrigerated, and reheated for two to three minutes in the air fryer before serving. You can also freeze the meatballs and then defrost and reheat them when ready to serve.
Chicken Riggies
Rating: Unrated
New!
This pasta dish from Utica, New York, is made with chicken, rigatoni, and hot or sweet peppers in a spicy tomato cream sauce. We used some of the brine from the jarred pickled peppers to marinate the chicken, and more to lend its punchy heat to the tomato sauce; the cream in the sauce tempers the heat of the peppers. If you have the time and patience, cover the pot of pasta with a lid and let the flavor meld for three minutes before eating. 
Cooking salmon in the air fryer allows the miso marinade to form a salty-sweet crust on the surface of each fillet. While the salmon rests, you can quickly cook the bok choy in the air fryer; the edges of the leaves will char a bit, creating a savory contrast to the ginger, soy and sesame oil sauce that goes on top.
Instant Pot Pork Tenderloin
Rating: Unrated
New!
Pork tenderloin cooked in the Instant Pot comes out tender and juicy. This particular recipe gets a boost of flavor from a spice rub that includes light brown sugar for sweetness, paprika, chili powder, onion powder, and cayenne pepper, as well as salt and pepper. Make sure you use a 1 ½-pound tenderloin, as a smaller cut of meat will overcook. Cooking the potatoes in chicken stock along with the pork (and pork drippings) means they emerge garlicky and savory, ready to be mashed with butter while you wilt the kale in the pot with the reserved cooking liquid. The entire meal is ready in just one hour, so it's a great option for busy nights where you still want something substantial. If you would like the doneness of the pork to be closer to medium, let the pressure release naturally for two minutes before venting the pot to manually release the pressure.
Campari Spritz
Rating: Unrated
New!
Campari is the slightly bitter cousin of Aperol, an Italian aperitif known as the star ingredient of the popular Aperol Spritz. Here, we swap out the slightly sweeter Aperol with Campari, and mix in a little blood orange juice, Prosecco, and grapefruit flavored sparkling water for an altogether refreshing cocktail. Make on a hot summer day, sit back, and dream of sitting in a café on the Italian Riviera.
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Fried Oysters with Remoulade
Rating: Unrated
New!
These crunchy fried oysters are an elegant, fun appetizer. They are served with a creamy remoulade made with mayonnaise, horseradish, capers, hot sauce, and Creole mustard— the perfect dipper for the crispy oysters. Even better, this recipe adjusts easily; for a smaller group just cut it half. Or turn this into a meal and make oyster po' boys: Cut 6 (6-inch) French rolls crosswise, and toast the rolls. Spread the rémoulade evenly on bottoms of the rolls, and top with the fried oysters, chopped lettuce and tomatoes, and dill pickles. Serve immediately.
Reverse Sear Steak
Rating: Unrated
New!
Learning ​​how to reverse-sear means you can serve steakhouse quality meals in your own kitchen. The trick to this ingenious cooking method is to first cook the steak in a low oven, then transfer it to a blazing hot skillet to quickly sear both sides. The result is a steak with a deeply browned crust and an inside that is evenly cooked. This method is especially helpful when cooking thick steaks; it allows the meat to cook exactly to your taste without overcooking or even burning the exterior of the steak. Although this steak is delicious straight out of the skillet, we added a buttery wine pan sauce to finish off the dish. The recipe for the herb butter added to the sauce makes more than you will need, and is very handy to have around to dress up a pot of rice or vegetables at the last minute.
Campari Spritz
Rating: Unrated
New!
Campari is the slightly bitter cousin of Aperol, an Italian aperitif known as the star ingredient of the popular Aperol Spritz. Here, we swap out the slightly sweeter Aperol with Campari, and mix in a little blood orange juice, Prosecco, and grapefruit flavored sparkling water for an altogether refreshing cocktail. Make on a hot summer day, sit back, and dream of sitting in a café on the Italian Riviera.
Fried Oysters with Remoulade
Rating: Unrated
New!
These crunchy fried oysters are an elegant, fun appetizer. They are served with a creamy remoulade made with mayonnaise, horseradish, capers, hot sauce, and Creole mustard— the perfect dipper for the crispy oysters. Even better, this recipe adjusts easily; for a smaller group just cut it half. Or turn this into a meal and make oyster po' boys: Cut 6 (6-inch) French rolls crosswise, and toast the rolls. Spread the rémoulade evenly on bottoms of the rolls, and top with the fried oysters, chopped lettuce and tomatoes, and dill pickles. Serve immediately.
Reverse Sear Steak
Rating: Unrated
New!
Learning ​​how to reverse-sear means you can serve steakhouse quality meals in your own kitchen. The trick to this ingenious cooking method is to first cook the steak in a low oven, then transfer it to a blazing hot skillet to quickly sear both sides. The result is a steak with a deeply browned crust and an inside that is evenly cooked. This method is especially helpful when cooking thick steaks; it allows the meat to cook exactly to your taste without overcooking or even burning the exterior of the steak. Although this steak is delicious straight out of the skillet, we added a buttery wine pan sauce to finish off the dish. The recipe for the herb butter added to the sauce makes more than you will need, and is very handy to have around to dress up a pot of rice or vegetables at the last minute.
Hot, sweet, crispy, and buttery, these wings are certain to become your next go-to recipe for Game Day or any time you want a hearty snack. The wings are tossed with lemon pepper seasoning then cooked until crispy in an air fryer. They are then coated with a buttery hot honey glaze and served with more of the glaze for dipping. A garnish of cilantro adds color and more brightness to the dish. 
Penne alla Vodka
Rating: Unrated
2
While some vodka sauce recipes lean on the creamy side, this version is more tomato-forward, loaded with bits of broken-down tomatoes and onion. The tomatoes are cooked for nearly an hour before the cream is added, concentrating their deep umami flavor. Vodka enhances the flavor of the tomatoes, and crushed red pepper adds just a hint of heat to balance out the richness of the sauce. Reserve some of the cooking water from the pasta to help achieve the perfect consistency in this sauce.
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Cranberry-Walnut Stuffing  
Rating: Unrated
New!
Tart cranberries and toasted walnuts add flavor and a crunch to this crowd-pleasing holiday side dish. Rustic hunks of toasted bread form the backbone of this stuffing; a buttery sauteed mixture of onion, celery, herbs, and cooked sausage fills it out with rich flavor. Simmering the cranberries first in vinegar and sugar both intensifies and rounds out their distinctive tartness. Serve this versatile side with roasted turkey, pork, or beef.
Smoked Salmon Dip
Rating: Unrated
2
This creamy, smokey dip features flaky smoked salmon two ways: half is finely chopped to add a pleasant texture to the dip alongside briny pops of capers, and the rest is pureed with the mayonnaise, sour cream, and cream cheese, lending its beautiful color and deepening the flavor. Fresh dill and chives keep the dip light while lemon juice adds brightness while also keeping the dip perfectly scoopable — no broken chips here.
Turkey Curry
Rating: Unrated
1
A spiced, tomato-based turkey curry is the perfect use for leftover Thanksgiving turkey. The blend of spices, like mustard seeds and cumin, meld with dried chiles, garam masala, and fresh garlic and ginger for a warming, richly flavored dish finished with a touch of cream. Inspired by the flavor profile of butter chicken, cooked chicken can be substituted for turkey. For a vegetarian version, try with paneer, tofu, chickpeas, or beans.
Balsamic Pork Chops
Rating: Unrated
1
Balsamic vinegar simmers with caramelized onions for a sweet and sour velvety sauce for pork chops. Pounded to tenderize rather than flatten, the pork is seasoned boldly with black pepper before crisping in a skillet. Quick enough to pull off on a weeknight, this main course will impress guests, too.
Cherry Cordial
Rating: Unrated
New!
Packed with the sweet flavor of ripe fruit and rounded out with subtle notes of orange, cardamom, and ginger, this cherry cordial has countless uses. Add a splash to a glass of sparkling wine or lemonade, or serve over ice with plenty of tonic water. Brush cherry cordial on layers of chocolate cake before frosting, or drizzle it over crepes or vanilla ice cream.
New York Sour
Rating: Unrated
1
The perfect balance of fruity red wine and smoky-sweet bourbon, the New York Sour cocktail is a classic for a reason. Shaking the cocktail with large ice cubes will chill the cocktail without diluting it—and those large cubes look great in a rocks glass, too. Be sure to pour the wine slowly over the back of the spoon to create the perfect float. If you're feeling adventurous, add an egg white to the shaker for a thicker viscosity.
This soul-satisfying bowl of beans and greens hits the spot on a night when you're low on time and energy and the fridge seems a bit bare. Smoked paprika adds a welcome hint of smokiness, while the combination of tomato paste and sun-dried tomatoes delivers an aromatic broth in record time. Can't find collards? Swap in kale or chard instead. Want to keep it vegan? Just skip the cheese. Feel free to use your favorite canned or home-cooked beans as well.
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The only thing better than a dark cocoa cookie with a hint of chewiness and a generous sprinkle of flaky salt is an impressively oversized one that’s designed to feed a crowd. Cut into wedges, the cookies resemble chocolate shortbread, but these treats—studded with chopped bittersweet chocolate and cacao nibs—are far more indulgent. To make this oversized cookie even more festive, bring it to the table topped with scoops of your favorite ice cream so that everyone can share.Related: More Cookie Recipes
Aji Verde, the iconic Peruvian green sauce, gets its robust, luscious flavor from Aji Amarillo paste, lime, scallions, and plenty of cilantro (some versions also include cheese and/or Huacatay, or "black mint," paste). The fresh mint in this version isn't at all traditional, but it is delicious—feel free to skip it if you'd prefer. Aji Verde is terrific served alongside rotisserie chicken or grilled meats, but it's equally good with roasted or grilled fish.Any leftovers make an excellent dip for crudité or topping for roasted vegetables like potatoes; or thin it out with lemon juice and olive oil for a creamy salad dressing.
Chicken Francese
Rating: Unrated
3
This chicken isn’t French, despite the Italian adjective. It isn’t really Italian, either—it’s a pure Italian-American red-sauce restaurant classic. But though the recipe is unabashedly old-school, chicken Francese is also hard to beat. Chicken cutlets in a light, Parm-infused batter, simmered in a lemony, chickeny cream sauce is a perfect weekend feast, especially when paired with a crisp arugula salad or lightly steamed asparagus.
The contrast between cool, lemony greens, warm spice-rubbed chicken and crispy oven-baked chickpeas makes this main-course salad especially satisfying. Any sturdy salad green would be delicious here, from crunchy romaine to torn spinach leaves and thinly sliced cabbage.
Bringing a skillet of chilaquiles topped with all the fixings to the table is a very wise weekend brunch move. Start out by firing up your broiler: Lightly charring the tomatillos, garlic, jalapeños, and onion until lightly charred gives the green salsa terrific depth of flavor. If you don’t have time to fry the tortilla chips at home, just pick up a bag of your favorite store-bought brand.
This tender, lemon-scented almond cake is topped with roasted rhubarb, but is equally delicious with any kind of fresh or roasted fruit, like roasted strawberries, fresh orange segments, or roasted plums. Since the cake doesn’t contain any gluten or wheat flour, it’s ideal for those who’d like to avoid gluten, and it’s especially versatile for Passover since it’s also dairy-free.
Most traditional chocolate chip cookie recipes start by creaming softened butter with sugar. Here, the butter is melted in a skillet until golden brown and nutty first. This simple step does require a bit of extra time (mainly for chilling the butter), but the result is an intensely toasty butterscotch note that makes these thin, chewy cookies irresistible. Using two kinds of bittersweet chocolate (chips and a chopped bar) adds luscious layers to the cookies. A final sprinkle of flaky salt enhances their flavor even more.Related: More Cookie Recipes