Diana Kennedy

From the Food & Wine archives, here's the late cookbook author's classic advice on cooking with chiles, a field guide to the most essential varieties in Mexican cooking, and some of her most beloved recipes.
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This chilaquiles recipe has been adapted from author Diana Kennedy's My Mexico. The sauce is made with tomatillos, serrano chiles, and garlic; the chilaquiles are finished with queso fresco, crème fraîche, and fresh cilantro. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
This is one of those simple but delicious stews that is typical of the cooking from the north of Mexico. Either pork or beef can be used, although pork lends a fuller flavor. This stew is typically made with the chile colorado from Chihuahua, which is also known as chile seco del norte or dried California chile. This stew develops flavor as it sits. Serve it with white rice or warm flour or corn tortillas. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
This old family recipe was given to the late Mexican food authority Diana Kennedy by Señora Maria Herrera Redondo de Williams in San Miguel de Allende. It consists of pasilla chiles stuffed with a mashed potato and cheese filling, then fried and covered with a slightly sweet tomatillo sauce. Serve the chiles with plenty of the sauce and corn tortillas. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
The late Mexican food authority Diana Kennedy wrote in Food & Wine about the day she spotted a man at the Jerez Sunday market filling a large bag with handfuls of shiny, multicolored chiles of all shapes and sizes. She asked how he was going to use them, and he said "I am going to make a salsa Mexicana of course." Kennedy knew it would be delicious, with all those crisp flavors and degrees of piquancy. This recipe for salsa Mexicana uses four kinds of chiles — poblano, red jalapeño, yellow chiles, and serrano chiles — but you can vary the salsa with what is available in your market. Do not remove the seeds of small chiles like serranos. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
Chipotles en Adobo
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This version of Chipotles en Adobo is based on recipes given to the late Mexican food authority Diana Kennedy by various neighbors of hers in Mexico. Adobo, a paste made of ground chiles, spices, herbs, and vinegar, is often used to season meat. These chipotles are served as a condiment, sprinkled with a little olive oil and crumbled queso fresco, or ground with peanuts, for example, in a cooked sauce. If you prefer a less pungent version, boil the chiles first for about five minutes. Then drain them, slit them open, and remove the seeds and what remains of the veins. Discard the water and start at the beginning of the recipe, reducing the cooking time by five minutes. If you wish to have a lighter sauce, add six ounces of broiled tomatoes to the adobo. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
Mexican food authority Diana Kennedy once wrote in Food & Wine that every recipe from Michoacán to Chihuahua that combines chiles with cheese is a winner. She came across this delicious variation made with beer. For the cheese, use either the medium-sharp Cheddar or domestic Muenster cheese called for here, or Chihuahua or Asadero cheese if available. Serve this dish as an appetizer with oven-dried or fried tortillas, or as a first course in individual gratin dishes with tortillas. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
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This tart, spicy recipe is a delicious way of using raw chilaca chiles. Poblano chiles can be substituted, but they do not have the same sweet, deep flavor. Serve as an appetizer or as a first course with corn tortillas. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
In Mexico, sopa seca, or dry soup, is served before the main course. This recipe comes from Libro di Cocina by Jules Gouffé, published in Mexico in 1893. Serve this dish as a separate course or lunch dish. The avocado, cheese, and limes that accompany it are the perfect counterbalance to the ancho chiles. Try also serving the soup with crumbled feta, chorizo, and a dollop of crème fraîche. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
Mexican food authority Diana Kennedy once wrote in Food & Wine that every recipe from Michoacán to Chihuahua that combines chiles with cheese is a winner. She came across this delicious variation made with beer. For the cheese, use either the medium-sharp Cheddar or domestic Muenster cheese called for here, or Chihuahua or Asadero cheese if available. Serve this dish as an appetizer with oven-dried or fried tortillas, or as a first course in individual gratin dishes with tortillas. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
This tart, spicy recipe is a delicious way of using raw chilaca chiles. Poblano chiles can be substituted, but they do not have the same sweet, deep flavor. Serve as an appetizer or as a first course with corn tortillas. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen
In Mexico, sopa seca, or dry soup, is served before the main course. This recipe comes from Libro di Cocina by Jules Gouffé, published in Mexico in 1893. Serve this dish as a separate course or lunch dish. The avocado, cheese, and limes that accompany it are the perfect counterbalance to the ancho chiles. Try also serving the soup with crumbled feta, chorizo, and a dollop of crème fraîche. RELATED: Diana Kennedy Shares 7 Recipes from Her Mexican Kitchen